Resilient Heritage: Protecting Your Historic Home from Natural Disasters

Resilient Heritage: Protecting Your Historic Home from Natural Disasters


Foreword

In Louisiana, the rich diversity of cultures is reflected in myriad building styles located in urban and rural communities across the state. These styles range from vernacular to classical to modern and more. Collectively or singularly, buildings and their characteristic features help to shape our sense of place and reflect cultural changes and influences over time. Recent disasters have set in motion a statewide effort by many agencies to shine a light on educating the public about disaster preparedness. For the Division of Historic Preservation, our priority is safeguarding historic buildings and properties from natural and man-made disasters.

In a given season, any region of the state may experience disasters resulting from ice storms, thunderstorms, tornados and/or flash flooding, just to name a few. The Louisiana Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness (GOHSEP) identified many of these climatological hazards in their recent State Hazard Mitigation Plan Update (2014). This plan is important to the citizens of Louisiana because it provides guidance for reducing or eliminating risks associated with disastrous events. Also, for the first time, GOHSEP has taken into consideration a select group of historic properties to profile for hazard vulnerability. This is an important step for the future of cultural resources and disaster planning in our state because many local and state agencies/organizations utilize this plan as they coordinate mitigation planning and implementation efforts.

This booklet is intended as a continuation of the DHP and GOHSEP plans to educate the public on disaster resiliency. While owners of historic residential buildings are the target audience, many others can benefit from the information provided here. Implementing the guidance outlined in this booklet will be a key tool in helping to safeguard historic buildings and possibly help prevent repetitive property loss, while maintaining the integrity of the historic building for years to come.

This booklet was prepared by the National Park Service’s National Center for Preservation Technology & Training (NCPTT) and the Louisiana Division of Historic Preservation (LDHP) to help residential property owners minimize risk and prepare for future disasters, as well as provide critical environmental and historic preservation information to the citizens and leaders of Louisiana. This publication has been funded by the Governor’s Of ce of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness (GOHSEP), through the terms of an Interagency Agreement with DHP to implement the Community Education and Outreach (CEO) Program for the Built Environment.

This public document is published at a total cost of $ 12,720. 3,000 copies of this public document were published in this 1st printing at a cost of $12,720. The total cost of all printings of this document including reprints is $12,720. This document was published by University Printing, Northwestern State University, Print Shop 102, Natchitoches, LA 71497 to provide education and information to the citizens and leaders of Louisiana under authority of LA R.S. 25:802(22). Printing of this material was purchased in accordance with the provisions of Title 43 of the Louisiana Revised Statutes.

May 2015

Acknowledgments

Sarah Marie Jackson, Architectural Conservator at the National Center for Preservation Technology & Training in Natchitoches, LA, provided content and layout. Patrick Sparks, Principal and Founder of Sparks Engineering, Inc. provided content and graphics. Cynthia J. Steward, Project Manager, Louisiana Division of Historic Preservation, provided graphics and editing. Edward FitzGerald, Architectural Conservator at the National Center for Preservation Technology & Training in Natchitoches, LA, provided editing and layout.

Special thanks goes to the staff at the National Center for Preservation Technology & Training and Louisiana Division of Historic Preservation for assistance with editing and layout. This publication is not copyrighted and can be reproduced without penalty.

Cover Image: Historic home in Marksville, La. Image Credit: NPS|Edward FitzGerald

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National Center for Preservation Technology and Training
645 University Parkway
Natchitoches, LA 71457

Email: ncptt[at]nps.gov
Phone: (318) 356-7444
Fax: (318) 356-9119