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62nd Caddo Conference and 27th East Texas Archeological Conference

University of Texas at Tyler

February 28 - February 29, 2020


Tyler, TX

| $20

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From a 10' x 24' mural by George Stephen Nelson at the Institute of Texan Cultures

From a 10′ x 24′ mural by George Stephen Nelson at the Institute of Texan Cultures

The University Center
University of Texas at Tyler

Friday and Saturday, February 28 and 29, 2020

Registration $20 at the door or at http://mayaresearchprogram.org/styled-10/

Thursday, February 27

7-9 PM  Informal Gathering at ETX Brewing Company,  221 S Broadway Ave, Tyler, TX 75702 (etxbrew.com)

Friday, February 28

8:00-9:00 Registration, coffee and light food

9:00-9:10 Introduction to the conferences

          Thomas Guderjan

9:10-9:30          Paying History Forward: Engaging the Public in the History of Place.

          Gary Pinkerton.

9:30-9:50     Mary Beth Trubitt

9:50-10:20   Coffee Break

10:20-10:40  Jowell Knives in East Texas Caddo Sites

          Drew Sitters

10:40-11:00 Biologically Available Pb: A Method for Ancient Human Sourcing Using Pb Isotopes from Prehistoric Animal Teeth

          John R. Samuelsen and Adriana Potra,

11:00- 11:20 Update on the Analysis of the A.S. Mann Site (41AN201), a Late Caddo Village in the Upper Neches River Valley, Anderson County, Texas

          Waldo Troell, David Kelley, Erin Phillips, August G. Costa, Leslie L. Bush, Melanie Nichols, and Timothy K. Perttula

11:20-11:40 The Anthropology/Archaeology Lab at Stephen F. Austin State University, 2019

          George Avery

11:40-12:00

12:00-1:30 LUNCH AVAILABLE AT THE MET IN THE UNIVERSITY CENTER

1:30-2:00  A Multi-Sensor Geophysical Survey of the Brackett site (34CK43) in Eastern Oklahoma

          Alexandra Flores

2:00-2:30 Examining Neosho Peoples and their Regional Interactions through Ceramic Design

          Paige Ford.

2:30-3:00 Coffee Break

3:00-3:30 The Dauber Site (34LF1624): Emergency Data Recovery Excavations at a Fort Coffee Phase Site on the Arkansas River

          Scott Hammerstedt, Amanda Regnier, Kary Stackelbeck, and Debra Green, Oklahoma Archeological Survey

3:30-4:00 Understanding the Organization of a Pilgrimage at Spiro

          Patrick C. Livingood, Scott W. Hammerstedt, Jami J. Lockhart, Tim Mulvihill, Amanda L. Regnier, George Sabo III, and John R. Samuelsen

4:30 PM KEYNOTE SPEAKER Dr. George Sabo

Saturday, February 29

8:00-9:00 Registration, coffee and light food

9:00-9:20

9:20-9:40

9:40-10:00

10:00-10:20 Coffee Break

10:20-10:40

10:40:11:00 Caddo mounds

          George Sabo

11:00-12:00 Friends of Caddo Mounds

12:00-1:30 Lunch served on site

1:30-2:30  Roundtable discussion by artists

2:30-4:30 Caddo Culture Club dances.

ABSTRACTS

A Multi-Sensor Geophysical Survey of the Brackett site (34CK43) in Eastern Oklahoma

Alexandra Flores (University of Oklahoma)

This presentation focuses on the preliminary results of a multi-sensor geophysical survey conducted at the Brackett site (34CK43) located in eastern Oklahoma. The Brackett site is a Harlan Phase (A.D. 1150-1250) Spiro-related mound site that was excavated by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) during the late 1930s. This project is the first geophysical survey that has been performed at Brackett, utilizing magnetometry, ground-penetrating radar, and electrical resistivity. These preliminary results reveal anomalies that are consistent with archaeological features typical of the Spiro region, as well as anomalies that are indicative of remnants from the WPA excavations.

Examining Neosho Peoples and their Regional Interactions through Ceramic Design

Paige Ford (University of Oklahoma)

The Neosho phase (AD 1400-1650) in northeastern Oklahoma, northwestern Arkansas, southwestern Missouri, and southeastern Kansas represents a Late Pre-Contact peoples integrated into a complex system of interaction. Though researchers have historically struggled in understanding the origins or cultural affiliation of this phase, it is clear that Neosho peoples—in part due to their location in a valuable ecotone—were enmeshed within a network of relationships with peoples on the Plains and in the Eastern Woodlands. This paper expands upon previous investigations conducted by the author which seek to clarify and better understand the nuances of these regional interactions during the Late Pre-Contact period. Using social network analysis on ceramic attribute data, these investigations will demonstrate the interconnectedness of communities of practice cross-regionally.

The Dauber Site (34LF1624): Emergency Data Recovery Excavations at a Fort Coffee Phase Site on the Arkansas River

Scott Hammerstedt, Amanda Regnier, Kary Stackelbeck, and Debra Green (Oklahoma Archeological Survey)

eIn June 2019, flooding of the Arkansas River upstream from Spiro exposed the Dauber site (34LF1624), a previously unrecorded village site dating to the Fort Coffee phase (AD 1450-1650). The Oklahoma Archeological Survey conducted an emergency data recovery of the site over the next several weeks. The receding flood waters removed soil from two large craters within the site boundaries leaving features exposed and partially intact above the surface of the crater. In this presentation, we discuss the challenges of conducting “reverse archaeology” and the contributions of this site to our understanding of Fort Coffee phase villages around Spiro.     

Understanding the Organization of a Pilgrimage at Spiro

Patrick C. Livingood, Scott W. Hammerstedt, Jami J. Lockhart, Tim Mulvihill, Amanda L. Regnier, George Sabo III, and John R. Samuelsen

Multisensor geophysical survey and targeted excavations at Spiro have identified a large number of hastily erected buildings that were occupied for only a short time, perhaps as part of a pilgrimage to the site.  In previous papers, we noted that these structures were aligned roughly in rows paralleling the orientation of the Craig mound.  Here, we present a more complete map of temporary structures to attempt to discern the social processes that may have driven this alignment.

The Anthropology/Archaeology Lab at Stephen F. Austin State University, 2019

George Avery (Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, Texas)

2019 was a particularly good year for the Anthropology/Archaeology Lab at Stephen F. Austin State University (SFA).  We earned re-certification from the Texas Historical Commission in the summer, and we were granted another ten years.  This time, we had no deficiencies.  We had the same support from SFA for the Work Study program that we’ve had all along—they allowed us enough Federal Work Study money to have four Student Workers.  In the fall, there has been an emphasis on undergraduate research at SFA, and Dr. Chandler-Ezel, a Cultural Anthropologist in the Department, really focused on recruiting volunteer students for the Lab.  We had eight student volunteers in the Fall semester, in addition to the one that we had previously.  Credit goes to Michael Andrews for being the student to step up and organize the volunteers.  We will discuss the various projects the Student Workers and Student Volunteers have been working on.

Paying History Forward: Engaging the Public in the History of Place.

Gary Pinkerton (Independent Researcher)

Discovering some 15 years ago that Trammel’s Trace crossed family land in Rusk County, Texas, was life-altering knowledge for me. Hundreds of miles of back roads, thousands of original land surveys, and countless conversations with archaeologists, translators, geographers, and local landowners and historians resulted in a detailed mapping of the old route. That initial curiosity has also resulted in a book on Trammel’s Trace and the dedication of two new historical markers. By incorporating East Texas-centric research on the Caddo into my research and learning more about the general location of documented sites, I was better able to interpret the history, landscape, and living conditions of the period for non-academic readers.

 

Dr. H.W. Brands, a UT historian, says he writes for his father who wanted something to read besides the Wall Street Journal. Brands describes him as an “interested generalist.” My transition from “curious guy” to “interested generalist” to “independent researcher” will not be the path for every person with a general awareness of the history of East Texas but it can serve as a guide for professionals wanting to more fully involve the public in the stories they want to tell. Ideas about how to engage others in Caddo history will be broken down into topics for discussion. This will help professionals in looking toward the general public as partners, as researchers, and as protectors of the legacy of place in East Texas.

Biologically Available Pb: A Method for Ancient Human Sourcing Using Pb Isotopes from Prehistoric Animal Teeth

John R. Samuelsen (Arkansas Archeological Survey and Department of Anthropology, University of Arkansas) and Adriana Potra (Department of Geosciences, University of Arkansas).

This study analyzes Pb isotopes combining biological (ancient human and prehistoric animal teeth) and geological (soil leachate, whole rock, and rock leachate) samples to determine the origins of prehistoric skeletal elements. It exemplifies how the biologically available Pb method assesses the early lifetime locations of ancient human populations using prehistoric animal teeth and the multivariate/linear nature of Pb isotope data.  Lead isotopes provide a valuable technique, in part, due to the correlation between their six stable isotope ratios. Other studies have used Pb isotopes for similar purposes, but no clear method for determining a local range has yet been formally defined and tested. The biologically available Pb method uses many prehistoric animal tooth enamel samples to establish a baseline for local ratios in the region, then compares their ratios’ linear patterning to human remains to test if they are non-local. The case study compares Pb isotopes from prehistoric animal teeth, human teeth, and whole rocks from southwest Arkansas. These results are compared to animal samples from Louisiana and Mississippi and human data from Illinois and New Mexico. Soil leachates, Pb concentrations of tooth enamel, and trace element analysis are used to assess contamination. Comparisons to southwest Arkansas whole rock Pb isotope ratios suggest they are too variable to be used for direct comparison to ancient human remains, illustrating that prehistoric animal teeth are more appropriate for direct comparison to prehistoric human teeth. The biologically available Pb method provides a key analysis tool needed for studies of ancient human sourcing.

Jowell Knives in East Texas Caddo Sites

Drew Sitters (Texas Historical Commission)

Jowell knives are a rare lithic stone tool found among historic Caddo burials in East Texas. With only three known sites producing such artifacts, there is little known about their use within Caddo society. Ongoing research aims to explore their function and reevaluate their classification as knives.

Update on the Analysis of the A.S. Mann Site (41AN201), a Late Caddo Village in the Upper Neches River Valley, Anderson County, Texas

Waldo Troell (TxDOT), David Kelley, Erin Phillips, August G. Costa (Coastal Environments, Inc.), Leslie L. Bush (Macrobotanical Analysis), Melanie Nichols (Pape-Dawson Engineers, Inc.) and Timothy K. Perttula (Archeological & Environmental Consultants, LLC)

In advance of a planned highway project, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) relocated a Caddo site that was recorded about 80 years earlier. Under contract to TxDOT, Coastal Environments conducted data recovery excavations of the A.S. Mann Site (41AN201) within the highway right of way. Ongoing analyses indicate this portion of the site was occupied by high status families associated with a larger Caddo community. The main occupation dates to the transition from the Frankston phase to the Allen phase (AD 1500s-1600’s), and includes artifacts documenting early European contact. Updates include results from the artifact inventory such as types and counts of ceramic vessels, pipes, projectile points, and stone tools. Studies include osteological, macrobotanical, and pollen/phytolith preservation.   

Organizers

Dr. Thomas Guderjan, Colleen Hanratty, Dr. Cory Sills, Dr. Amanda Regnier, Christy Simmons, Anthony Souther, Dr. Timothy Perttula

Center for Social Sciences Research, University of Texas at Tyler.

Sponsors

The Center for Social Science Research and the Department of Social Science

University of Texas at Tyler.

Friends of Northeast Texas Archaeology.

Tejas Archaeology.

Maya Research Program.

Beta Analytic, Inc.

Texas Department of Transportation.

East Texas Archaeological Society

Kevin Stringley

Humanities Texas

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Details

Start:
February 28 @ 8:00 AM
End:
February 29 @ 5:00 PM
Cost:
$20
Event Categories:
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Organizer

Unnamed Organizer
Email:

Venue

The University Center
3900 University Blvd, Tyler, TX 75799 United States
+ Google Map
Phone:
903.566.7000
Website:
https://www.uttyler.edu/socialsciences/
National Center for Preservation Technology and Training
645 University Parkway
Natchitoches, LA 71457

Email: ncptt[at]nps.gov
Phone: (318) 356-7444
Fax: (318) 356-9119