BETA

Royal Danby

Submitted by Raven Mueller on Thu, 2014-07-10 09:50
Trade Name Alias: 
Stone Type (Commercial): 
Description: 

Gray muted veins. Consistent, medium veining.

Quarry: 
Availability: 
Available
Physical Data
Color: 
Munsell Color(s): 
Absorption (%): 
0.06
Density (lb/cf): 
169.20
Flexural Strength, Dry (psi): 
1,226
Modulus of Rupture, Dry (psi): 
1,077
Compressive Strength, Dry (psi): 
9,475
Bulk Specific Gravity: 
2.71
Abrasion Resistance: 
12.10
Geology
Stone Type (Lithologic): 
Chronostratigraphy: 
Grain Shape: 
Angular
Grain Size: 
Coarse
Medium
Petrographic Description: 

Specimen: 2014-049-1
This sample is a relatively fine grained marble. The texture is granoblastic with random grain orientation. Maximum grain size is near 1.75 mm, minimum is .15, and the modal size is approximately .75 to 1.25 mm. Twinning of calcite/dolomite crystals is ubiquitous mostly following rhomb edges or bisecting the acute angle. Grain boundaries are mostly sutured. Non-carbonate accessory minerals are extremely rare (<1%) and generally too small for definitive identification with modal size near .15 mm. Quartz is clearly present in extremely low quantities. There is also a first-second order birefringence mineral, possibly tremolite, sillimanite, or diopside among others. Most accessory minerals occur as distinct crystals at grain boundaries as opposed to inclusions within calcite/dolomite crystals. A few of the accessory minerals occur in concentrations of very fine grained crystals. This likely reflects their genesis through recrystallization as an alteromorph. There is no appreciable weathering in this sample or visible macrostructure such as foliation.
MP 7/7/2015

Specimen: 2014-049-2
This sample is a fined grained marble with distinct zones of grain size. The texture is overall granoblastic with random grain orientation. Maximum grain size is near 1.25 mm, minimum is near .1 mm. Several modes of grain size are present with high frequencies around .6 mm and .85 mm. Twinning in calcite/dolomite crystals is near ubiquitous. Most twin lamellae follow rhomb edges. Grain boundaries are sutured. Non carbonate accessory minerals are essentially absent (<1%). The accessory minerals that are present occur mostly as independent minerals at grain boundaries as opposed to inclusions. They generally have rounded edges. These are far too small to identify but are first-second order birefringent. There is no appreciable weathering in this sample. The textural differences minimally reflect slight macrostructure foliation.
MP 7/7/2015

Specimen: 2014-069-1
This sample is a relatively coarse grained marble. The texture is overall granoblastic with random grain orientation. Maximum grain size is around 1.5 mm, minimum is .1 mm, the modal size is .6 to 1.2 mm. Grain boundaries are mostly curved or straight with few truly sutured boundaries. Twin lamellae in carbonates are common. Quartz (possibly some feldspar) is the most common non-carbonate accessory mineral, occurring as isolated grains and in small aggregate clusters. Maximum quartz grain size is .65 mm, most are significantly smaller. Quartz constitutes only about 1 to 2 percent of slide area and occurs mainly at grain boundaries with rare examples within calcite crystals. There is a local aggregate of foliated mica (phlogopite, muscovite?) occurring discontinuously over a region about 5 by .4 mm. The only other accessory minerals are extremely rare and small ~.05 mm opaque minerals. There is no appreciable weathering in this sample or visible macrostructure such as foliation aside from the small vein of mica already mentioned. The dark green-grey clouds present in the hand sample cannot by tied to any minerals observed in this thin section.
MP 9/4/2015

Specimen: 2014-069-2
This sample is a coarse grained marble. The texture is overall granoblastic with random grain orientation. Maximum grain size is around 2 mm, minimum is .1 mm, the modal size is .5 to 1 mm. Grain boundaries are mostly curved or straight with a lesser amount of sutured boundaries. Twin lamellae in carbonates are ubiquitous. Indistinguishable quartz and feldspars are the most common non-carbonate accessory minerals, occurring mostly as isolated grains. Maximum quartz grain size is .25 mm, most are significantly smaller. These accessory minerals constitute less than 1 percent of slide area; they occur both at grain boundaries and within calcite crystals. Most are likely quartz, but several instances with albite or Carlsbad twinning were noted. Other accessory minerals are extremely rare. Several laths of a likely mica (phlogopite, muscovite?) were present in a localized portion of the slide with average dimensions around .12 by .02 mm. The only other accessory minerals are extremely rare and small ~.05 mm opaque minerals. There is no appreciable weathering in this sample or visible macrostructure such as foliation.

Images

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Specimen ID
2014-049-1 Image of specimen in dry conditions. Finish: download image
2014-049-2 Image of specimen in dry conditions. Finish: download image
2014-049-3 No image available.
2014-069-1 Image of specimen in dry conditions. Finish: Polisheddownload image
2014-069-2 Image of specimen in dry conditions. Finish: Honeddownload image

Thin Sections

Click thumbnail for larger image.
Specimen ID Non-polarized Cross-polarized
2014-049-1 Specimen shown in non-polarized light.download image Specimen shown in cross-polarized light.download image
2014-049-2 No image available.
2014-049-3 No image available.
2014-069-1 Specimen shown in non-polarized light.download image Specimen shown in cross-polarized light.download image
2014-069-2 Specimen shown in non-polarized light.download image Specimen shown in cross-polarized light.download image

Quarry

NOTE: Quarry locations are approximate.

Danby Quarry
181 Quarry Road
05739 Danby , Vermont
United States
43° 19' 20.892" N, 73° 0' 15.192" W
Vermont US

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