A Diver uses multibeam sonar to identify submerged artifacts as part of a 2009 grant to the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum.

A diver uses multibeam sonar to identify submerged artifacts as part of a 2009 grant to the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum.

You’ve applied to the PTT Grant program and you’ve received a grant. Now what? In addition to the research you proposed to undertake, NCPTT has some unique requirements that we include in the grant agreement. First and foremost, we want to keep your projects in the public eye. We want to show preservationists and enthusiasts alike the good work you are doing. Let’s look at each of the things we ask for:

1.  A press release.
This one is easy to understand. We want your local community to know what you are doing and how NCPTT’s research funds have made that possible. It’s important to describe your work to the general public in a language they grasp. It’s also important to accurately acknowledge the funding from NCPTT. Also, once we have these press releases, we use them on our website to promote your work.

2.  Six high resolution images (digital photographs).
This requirement is a little tricky and requires prior planning on your part. It helps to know why we need the images. NCPTT uses your photographs to talk about your work through newsletters, publications, public lectures, and on our website. We also use the best photograph on the cover of your final report.

This photograph shows risks to cultural heritage at Bastrop State park. It was part of a 2012 grant resource from Texas Parks and Wildlife.

This photograph shows fire risks to cultural heritage at Bastrop State park. It was part of a 2012 grant resource from Texas Parks and Wildlife.

Here are some pointers for creating your images for the PTT Grant resources.

  • Think about your photographs. Try to photograph things that help tell the story of your research.
  • Show examples of the problems you are trying to address. For example, if you are undertaking research on how climate change affects a cultural resource, show a resource that has been affected.
  • Show people doing things. For example, if you are developing a new analytical tool, photograph the person operating the instrument.
  • If a person is working in the lab or in the field, make sure they are wearing and using proper safety equipment. We cannot use a photograph if it documents a poor work safety practice.
  • Make sure the photograph is well-lit, properly exposed, and in focus.
  • Take a variety of photographs, showing close ups, overviews, etc.
  • Provide us with a caption for each photograph you send us. Remember the “who, what, when, where and why” in the caption.
This image shows a volunteer using the "What's out there?" mobile application used to document historic landscapes.  The App was developed by the Cultural Landscape Foundation with a 2012 grant from NCPTT.

This close-up image shows a volunteer using the “What’s out there?” mobile application used to document historic landscapes. The App was developed by the Cultural Landscape Foundation with a 2012 grant from NCPTT.

3.  A 400 word article.
The 400 word article is used to tell others what you’ve done after the grant is over. We use these articles to help write board reports and to explain to people the significance of your work. We interact with a wide cross-section of the American public. Not everyone knows scientific and technical terminology. Write your article for a general audience. Make sure to tell us the significant results and discoveries that resulted from the grant. We will use your 400 word article as a blog post on our website to announce the conclusion of your work.

4.  An interim report.
The interim report allows NCPTT to keep abreast of the progress you’ve made on the project. It also gives us a heads-up in the unlikely event that you’ve run into problems, need to reallocate funds within the budget, or need other changes to the grant agreement.

5.  Administrative Summary.
This report allows us to more easily close out the grant. It documents changes in the grant that you requested and allows us to know how the work costs were distributed. In addition, it tells us about the final resources that resulted from the work. The resources may be publications, presentations, software, videos, workshops, books and more.

6.  A final report.
This report is made public upon completion of your grant. It should be written in such a way that all the pertinent information is presented in a standard format. Sections of the report should include a table of contents, executive summary, introduction, methods and/or materials, results and discussion, conclusions, acknowledgments, and references. The Chicago Manual of Style should be used for this report.

This download provides templates and directions for creating your reports.

Structured light being used to document the Abiquiu Gate as part of a 2011 grant to Georgia O'Keeffe Museum.

Structured light being used to document the Abiquiu Gate as part of a 2011 grant to Georgia O’Keeffe Museum.

Each grant is assigned to a grants specialist at NCPTT and should be listed in the cover letter you received with your grant agreement. Your grant specialist can answer questions you have about what is expected from your grant. They should be the first point of contact for you. If they don’t know the answer to your question, they will refer you to someone who can help. We look forward to working with you.

Download 2015 Reports Attachment E (PDF, 68KB)

National Center for Preservation Technology and Training
645 University Parkway
Natchitoches, LA 71457

Email: ncptt[at]nps.gov
Phone: (318) 356-7444
Fax: (318) 356-9119