Cumberland Island is Georgia’s largest and southernmost barrier island. Home to forests, marches, and pristine beaches, Cumberland Island tells the stories of Natives, missionaries, enslaved African Americans, and wealthy industrialists from the island’s past. Visitors to the park must take a ferry ride from the mainland to the island. Once on the island, they can enjoy a wide variety of recreational activities as well as ranger and private guided tours.

Archeologists have played a role in the preservation of the national seashore. Various tasks have been completed including an archeological survey of portions of the Dungeness Historic District. The Dungeness Historic District is located at the south end of Cumberland Island and includes at least twenty-nine historic structures associated with the Carnegie-era. Additionally, archeologists conducted a ground-penetrating radar survey at the Dungeness Historic District to identify prehistoric and historic architectural and archeological features in the upper garden of the Dungeness Mansion ruins. These are just a few of the many projects that archeologists have completed on the island.

For more information about Cumberland Island National Seashore, visit its website. For more information about various archeological projects on the island, check out this report.

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National Center for Preservation Technology and Training
645 University Parkway
Natchitoches, LA 71457

Email: ncptt[at]nps.gov
Phone: (318) 356-7444
Fax: (318) 356-9119