This is a pre-recorded webinar featuring moderator Steve Pine with presenters Dan Riley, Jason Church, and Melody Gayeski. All materials used by our presenters will be available for download.

Steve Pine is Senior Conservator of Decorative Arts at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston. He has assisted in recovery assessments and cleanup of public and private collections after Katrina and Rita in 2005 and collaborated on recovery workshops in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas.

Steve was deployed as part of the National Heritage Responders to assist cultural institutions on Galveston Island following Hurricane Ike and in New York City following Superstorm Sandy. He is a member and President Emeritus of the Texas Collections Emergency Resource Alliance (Texas CERA).


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Hurricane Hazards and Being Prepared During 2020 Hurricane Season

As we approach the heart of the hurricane season on the Gulf Coast that seems appropriate, we remind ourselves of the resources and experience we have available to help us prepare for storms. Armed with the most accurate and useful information, recognition of the public support organizations at hand to help, and time to review our vulnerabilities, we can place ourselves in a position to minimize risks and improve outcomes should another hurricane hit our area.

0We have some distinguished and accomplished a group of speakers this morning. I don’t want to delay too much. So I’d like to introduce our first presenter Dan Riley of NOAA. Dan is The Warning Coordination Meteorologist at the weather’s National Weather Center for the Houston Galveston area, which is a part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, providing timely and accurate information projections. We all rely on too many good decisions regarding storm potential and its impact on the region.

Now I’ll turn the webinar over to Dan.

Hurricane Hazards and Being Prepared During 2020 Hurricane Season Dan Reilly Warning Coordination Meteorologist National Weather Service Houston/Galveston

Hurricane Hazards and Being Prepared During 2020 Hurricane Season
Dan Reilly
Warning Coordination Meteorologist National Weather Service Houston/Galveston

Good morning. I’d like to talk to you today about hurricane hazards, and also how to prepare for the 2020 hurricane season.

The first thing I want you to know is every storm is different. Typically contains some combination of the hazards you see here: damaging winds, storm surge, flooding, flooding from heavy rains, and tornadoes. And as we know, those of us who live in hurricane country, every storm really is different. Hurricane Ike was so much different than Hurricane Harvey, which was different as well from something like Tropical Storm Allison. And so we’ll talk about these different hazards in the presentation today.


Every storm is different, brings these in different proportions: Damaging Winds Alicia,1983 Ike, 2008 Flooding Rains Tornadoes Harvey, 2017 Harvey, 2017 High surf, rip currents Damaging Winds Alicia,1983 Ike, 2008 Flooding Rains Tornadoes Harvey, 2017 Harvey, 2017 High surf, rip currents

Every storm is different, brings these in different proportions: Damaging Winds Alicia,1983 Ike, 2008 Flooding Rains Tornadoes Harvey, 2017 Harvey, 2017 High surf, rip currents.
Damaging Winds
Alicia,1983
Ike, 2008
Flooding Rains
Tornadoes
Harvey, 2017
Harvey, 2017
High surf, rip currents.

Every storm is different, brings these in different proportions: Damaging Winds Alicia,1983 Ike, 2008 Flooding Rains Tornadoes Harvey, 2017 Harvey, 2017 High surf, rip currents. Damaging Winds: Alicia,1983; Storm Surge Flooding: Ike, 2008; Flooding Rains: Harvey, 2017. Tornadoes: Harvey, 2017. High surf, rip currents. Another fifth hazard Do you might add to is the high surf and rip currents for those folks at the beach. Those can also be very important.


Which Hazards are the Most Dangerous? The water - related hazards cause about 90% of fatalities! Cause of death in the United States directly attributable to Atlantic tropical cyclones, 1963–2012. Percentage of 1963–2012 Atlantic tropical cyclones (right scale) and deadly U.S. tropical cyclones (left scale) in which noted types of fatalities occurred in the United States. Rappaport, Edward N., 2014: Fatalities in the United States from Atlantic Tropical Cyclones: New Data and Interpretation.

Which Hazards are the Most Dangerous? The water – related hazards cause about 90% of fatalities! Cause of death in the United States directly attributable to Atlantic tropical cyclones, 1963–2012. Percentage of 1963–2012 Atlantic tropical cyclones (right scale) and deadly U.S. tropical cyclones (left scale) in which noted types of fatalities occurred in the United States. Rappaport, Edward N., 2014: Fatalities in the United States from Atlantic Tropical Cyclones: New Data and Interpretation.

Which Hazards are the Most Dangerous? The water-related hazards cause about 90% of fatalities! Cause of death in the United States directly attributable to Atlantic tropical cyclones, 1963–2012. Percentage of 1963–2012 Atlantic tropical cyclones (right scale) and deadly U.S. tropical cyclones (left scale) in which noted types of fatalities occurred in the United States. Rappaport, Edward N., 2014: Fatalities in the United States from Atlantic Tropical Cyclones: New Data and Interpretation.So of those five hazards, which are the most dangerous?

Which are the most deadly?

And that’s what the pie chart on the left-hand side is showing us the percentage of fatalities caused by each of a number of hazards. And you can see storm surge flooding accounts for about half of the fatalities, and flooding from heavy rain a little over a quarter.

So, it really is the water-related hazards that are the most deadly.

Notice wind 8%, tornado 3%, still very dangerous, but it really is the water-related hazards, and you might include surfing that as well, that are the most deadly.

Now the bar chart on the right-hand side is also interesting.

It tells us what percentage of storms have a fatality from that given hazard. And what you can see there are fatalities from rainfall, flooding is found in about half of the storms.

And due to a storm surge of about 10%.

But when we do get the storm surge events, it can be very, very many fatalities.

The Galveston 1900 hurricane is a great example of that. 6,000 to 8000 people died in that storm due to storm surge, our nation’s greatest natural disaster to this day.

Anatomy of the Hurricane: Ike View from Radar. Note Hurricane Eye, Eyewall and Spiral Bands. Highest winds typically in the eyewall of the hurricane. Gusty winds and tornadoes in the spiral bands (especially on the right side of the track).

Anatomy of the Hurricane: Ike View from Radar. Note Hurricane Eye, Eyewall, and Spiral Bands. Highest winds typically in the eyewall of the hurricane. Gusty winds and tornadoes in the spiral bands (especially on the right side of the track).

Let’s look at the different parts of the hurricane.

Now what we have here is a radar image of Hurricane Ike.

And most of us are probably familiar looking at the weather radar. The different colors indicate different rainfall intensities. So the red indicates heavy rain, the yellow moderate, and the glean the green light rain.

That area in the middle of the hurricane there with blue. That’s the idea of the hurricane, and in the eye, the winds go nearly calm right in the middle of the storm, and the eye actually passed over the weather office so I can confirm—sure enough, very calm conditions in the eye.

But in the ring surrounding the eye, that’s called the eyewall.

That’s where the highest winds are in the hurricane.

So if the eyewall passes over your location, you’re going to get those highest winds in the storm.

Also, I’ve outlined some of the bands kind of spiraling out from the center. These are called spiral bands. You can get gusty winds, very heavy rain, and tornadoes. In those spiral bands, especially on the right-hand side of the storm.

Hurricane Winds. Photo Credit: Jeff Evans, NWS/NOAA

Hurricane Winds. Photo Credit: Jeff Evans, NWS/NOAA

The Hurricane wind hazard, as I mentioned, storm surge flooding from heavy rains is the most deadly but hurricane winds also extremely dangerous.

These are some photos from Hurricane Michael, which hit the Florida Panhandle a few years ago, made landfall as a Category 5 hurricane.


Saffir Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Describes the wind hazard; only partially related to surge and unrelated to flooding rains and tornadoes. NOT an overall severity index, need to consider the other hazards!

Saffir Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Describes the wind hazard, only partially related to surge and unrelated to flooding rains and tornadoes. NOT an overall severity index. We need to consider other hazards!

And what do I mean by Category 5 Hurricane? That’s the – that’s five on the safer Simpson hurricane wind scale goes from one to five, where five is the most significant, and one is the lowest end of that scale.

But notice the winds that are assigned to each category.

Category 1 sustained winds of 74 to 95 miles per hour. Very, very strong damaging winds, even at the Category One level. So don’t let your guard down.

If it’s a Category 1 or Category 2, if that eyewall comes over you, you’re going to get those very, very high winds.

Hurricane Ike was actually a Category 2 wetland fall with 110 miles per hour sustained winds.

But the other thing I want to point out here is it is a wind scale. It is not an all-hazards severity scale.

Someone thing we saw with Hurricane Ike is people were saying, “Oh, it’s just a two, you know, maybe I won’t evacuate.”

But the fact is the storm surge from this very large Category 2 Hurricane was more like a Category 4, you know, very, very life-threatening and very dangerous.

So, don’t rely too much on this one number.

Hurricane Harvey. Category 4 Wind Damage Rockport, TX. Photo Credit: Timothy Fadek /Redux for CNN. Courtney Sacco and Matt Woolbright/Caller-Times via USA TODAY NETWORK

Hurricane Harvey. Category 4 Wind Damage Rockport, TX. Photo Credit: Timothy Fadek /Redux for CNN. Courtney Sacco and Matt Woolbright/Caller-Times via USA TODAY NETWORK

Hurricane Harvey was actually a Category 4 at landfall where it made landfall down the coast down in the Rockport area.

In that area, we saw wind gusts of 150 miles per hour in that one area.

And if we do get a high, high category storm like this, you can expect the wind has hazard can be very devastating, very dangerous, and you can see some of the damage therefrom this Category 4 landfall.


Water Hazards: Rainfall and Storm Surge Flooding

Water Hazards: Rainfall and Storm Surge Flooding

The water hazards, as I’ve said, rainfall and storm surge flooding.

These are the most dangerous, the most deadly.


Harvey’s Slow Looping Track. Harvey made landfall near Rockport, TX as a cat 4 major hurricane then slowed down and “weakened” (wind speed), was “downgraded” to a tropical storm; slow moving hurricanes, tropical storms, depressions are notorious for producing extreme rainfall, flooding. Spiral bands produced the most intense rain.

Harvey’s Slow Looping Track. Harvey made landfall near Rockport, TX as a cat 4 major hurricane, then slowed down and “weakened” (wind speed), was “downgraded” to a tropical storm, slow-moving hurricanes, tropical storms, depressions are notorious for producing extreme rainfall, flooding. Spiral bands produced the most intense rain.

And we have a recent example of course.

Hurricane Harvey, you can see it spinning around, making landfall down there near Rockport, Texas.

And for folks on the mid-Texas coast and the coastal bend, Harvey was all about very high winds and storm surge.

But for us in the Houston-Galveston area, we were getting those spiral bands, and you can see the bands on the radar loop.

They’re feeding into our area, producing very, very heavy rain over several day periods.

And of course, that leads to really catastrophic flooding from that record amounts of rainfall.

Notice Harvey’s track is shown on the map on the right-hand side.

And what you see is the storm coming steadily in and then sort of stalling and then just sort of slowly looping back over the area and passing just south of Galveston before making a second landfall in Louisiana.

Any time you have a Hurricane or Tropical Storm moving slowly, right away, you need to be thinking that someplace is going to get some very, very high rainfall amounts and perhaps some flooding.

And absolutely that’s what happened here with Harvey.

Record Rainfall; This analysis a combination of gauges and radar estimates; extremely large area of 30 to 60 inches of rain! 60.58 inches near Nederland, TX.

Record Rainfall; This analysis a combination of gauges and radar estimates, an extremely large area of 30 to 60 inches of rain! 60.58 inches near Nederland, TX.

As I mentioned, these were record rainfall amounts that occurred with Harvey the most ever from a tropical system…an Atlantic tropical system. Over 60 inches of rain, near Nederland, Texas.

And then on this map, you can see some dark blue areas. Is greater than 50 inches of rain over multiple counties.

So it’s not just the extremely high rainfall amounts. But it’s a very large coverage from Harvey.

That occurred just a tremendous amount of rainfall.

Never had a storm produce this amount of rain over such a large area. And no surprise, it led to catastrophic flooding, and unfortunately, many fatalities. So, Harvey was unusual.

But wouldn’t you know, just a few years later, in 2019, we had Tropical Storm Imelda, which also produced just a tremendous amount of rainfall.

And just like Harvey, it was really the spiral bands from the storm that was responsible for all the heavy rain.

You can see, in this case, the band was kind of on the backside of that swirl, and the area impacted was much smaller. Smaller than with Harvey.

But we did have some amounts of greater than 40 inches of rain, most of that falling within about a 12 to 18 hour period. So, in this case, it missed the Houston metro area just barely. It fell over a more rural area. But nonetheless, that amount of rain over such a short period of time led to more catastrophic flooding.

Hurricane Ike, 2008

Hurricane Ike, 2008

Let’s talk a little bit now about Hurricane Ike, which occurred in 2008.

And you can see the radar from Hurricane Ike. This was a much bigger hurricane than say in Imelda.

And also notice it moved fairly quickly out of the area. So, in this case, the rainfall was not the dominant hazard.

But with a large hurricane like this, it pushes a lot of water up onto land.

So storm surge flooding, in fact, was the biggest impact from Hurricane Ike also, there were power outages for millions of customers because we had a very large wind field with Hurricane Ike, a very large footprint.

And as we said, every storm is different is the most dominant hazard here was storm surge.

Storm Surge Flooding. Hurricane Ike: SE TX Coast Storm Surge/ Coastal Flooding For storms like Ike, Carla, 1900 storm, water rises well before arrival of winds. Don’t wait too long to leave!

Storm Surge Flooding. Hurricane Ike: SE TX Coast Storm Surge/ Coastal Flooding For storms like Ike, Carla, 1900 storm, the water rises well before the arrival of winds. Don’t wait too long to leave!

Here are some photographs from Galveston and the West End of Galveston Island.

You can see, I want you to look at the photograph in the lower left, you can see the water levels had risen significantly by Friday morning.

With this, the winds of the storm yet to arrive.

And so if you look at that photo, there are some people being rescued there who had intended to leave Friday morning, thinking the storm wasn’t going to arrive until late that night. But by then, it was too late.

The water had risen. They couldn’t get out of their vehicles.

So, they had to be rescued by boat or by helicopter and Coast Guard. Actually, read you’d hundreds of folks during the day ahead of the storm coming in, no doubt saved a lot of lives.

Notice also the surf.

They’re hitting the sea wall, all that spray getting pushed up.

You know the waves in the surf are another very hazardous feature of these hurricanes.

 Hurricane Ike: Bolivar Peninsula Devastation; Image from www.hawkeyemedia.com/bolivar/

Hurricane Ike: Bolivar Peninsula Devastation; Image from www.hawkeyemedia.com/bolivar/

And then here’s the aftermath of Hurricane Ike.

This is Bolivar Peninsula, the barrier island just up the coast from Galveston; you can see the power of water surging in and then pulling right back out, pretty much swept that area clean so you can see why we really have to get people out of the storm surge zones.

This is really not survivable.

If you’re stuck on this barrier island with a storm like Hurricane Ike.

So one question about all these hazards needs to consider is what is your risk either at your home or business?

Know your storm surge risk. If Storm Tide greater than ground elevation, you can be flooded. Note similarities to evacuation zone map which are based mostly on storm surge risk. Land elevation above mean sea level. From lidar data.

Know your storm surge risk. If Storm Tide greater than ground elevation, you can be flooded. Note similarities to evacuation zone maps, which are based mostly on storm surge risk. Land elevation above means sea level from lidar data.

Are you at risk for storm surge flooding?

You know, what about winds?

You know, what, what?

What level is your structure built on knowing what to what winds can it stand strong?

But first talking about storm surge, it’s really all about the elevation of the ground where you’re at.

If you’re if your ground elevation is at a lower level than the water is forecast to get to from the high tide and the storm surge, then you’re liable to be flooded, especially if there’s no levee or anything else between you and the water.

And so what we have on the map on the right-hand side is ground elevation data taken by LIDAR, and you can see all those areas in green are less than 10 feet above sea level.

And those were much the same areas that were flooded from Hurricane Ike storm surge, which was up around 10 to 13 feet along the bay. And look at two chambers county you can see flooding almost all the way up to 10. there so some of our counties are quite a low elevation wise and are vulnerable to storm surge flooding.

Incidentally, the evacuation charts in the lower left for the Houston Galveston area. You can see how similar they are to the ground elevation map. And that’s because they’re based primarily on that surge hazard risk.

There is a website shown at the bottom of the page here where you can get kind of a general look at what your risk is at your location.

I’ve zoomed in here in the Houston Galveston area, but you can look at any part of the coast across the nation using this website. So this is kind of a worst-case, flooding above ground level.

Reasonable Worst Case Surge Flooding, Category One Hurricane

Reasonable Worst Case Surge Flooding, Category One Hurricane

For a Category 1.


Reasonable Worst Case Surge Flooding, Category Two Hurricane

Reasonable Worst Case Surge Flooding, Category Two Hurricane

Category 2.


Category 3.

Now, notice the Reds here are greater than nine feet above ground level.


Reasonable Worst Case Surge Flooding, Category 4 Hurricane

Reasonable Worst Case Surge Flooding, Category 4 Hurricane

Worst case, Category 4.


Reasonable Worst Case Surge Flooding, Category 5 Hurricane

Reasonable Worst Case Surge Flooding, Category 5 Hurricane

And a worst-case Category 5.

So, if your location, either home or business, is in one of these shaded areas, you do have a storm surge risk.

The flipside is if it’s not, storm surge is not a major concern for you.

What about those hatched areas there? Those are levied areas. And so it’s really hard to portray the risk for the levee areas on a map like this, but just understand that levees are really meant to protect property.

You know, I wouldn’t trust my life or the life of my family to a levy fails, then you’re really in trouble. So keep that in mind.

Tornadoes/Waterspouts: Can cause locally more significant damage. Usually weaker EF0 and EF1 tornadoes. Most common in spiral bands right of the center track.

Tornadoes/Waterspouts: Can cause more significant damage locally. Usually weaker EF0 and EF1 tornadoes. Most common in spiral bands right of the center track.

And then in the last half, I want to mention tornadoes and water spouts.

These quite often occur in the spiral bands on the right-hand side of the track.

If you look at the radar image on the lower left there, you can see hurricane Harvey, the center of it spinning there, just southeast of Gonzales. And, but the bands are over the Houston Galveston area with thunderstorms along with those spiral bands. And many of those were spinning and producing tornadoes.

So, we estimate 22 tornadoes with Harvey, again, mostly in those spiral bands.

So those are the hurricane hazards.


Stay Informed! Keep Track of What is Going on in Tropics

Stay Informed! Keep Track of What is Going on in Tropics

How do we stay informed?

How do we be best prepared during the hurricane season?

One part of that is to keep track of what’s going on in the tropics. You can see some websites there.

hurricanes.gov, weather.gov is the National Weather Service. weather.gov/houston will get you to the Houston Galveston area. And then it’s good to look at Emergency Management pages for your jurisdiction to stay informed hurricanes.gov.

By the way, that’s the National Hurricane Center website.


Tropical Weather Outlook: 2-day; Describes the chance a disturbance will develop into a tropical depression or tropical storm in the next 48 hours “X” marks current center position (estimated) Percent likelihood is given There is also a mouseover text discussion for more details. hurricane.gov

Tropical Weather Outlook: 2-day; Describes the chance a disturbance will develop into a tropical depression or tropical storm in the next 48 hours. “X” marks the current center position (estimated). Percent likelihood is given. There is also a mouseover text discussion for more details. hurricane.gov

And so let’s take a look at this tropical weather outlook, the two-day outlook. This is from Monday, August 17.

When we’re doing this recording, and what do you see here?

Well, you’ve got two yellow x’s and a percentage listed.

These are two disturbances over the tropical Atlantic that have a 20% chance of becoming a tropical depression or Tropical Storm over the next two days in hence the name today tropical weather outlook so it tells you what disturbances the hurricane center is monitoring and what is the possibility they could develop into something more serious tropical depression or storm and then perhaps even a hurricane after that.


Tropical Weather Outlook: 5-day; Describes the chance a disturbance will develop into a tropical depression or tropical storm in the next 5 days. “X” marks current center position (estimated). Hatched area is the zone where that development could occur. There is also a mouseover text discussion for more details and to get the percentage chance.

Tropical Weather Outlook: 5-day; Describes the chance a disturbance will develop into a tropical depression or tropical storm in the next 5 days. “X” marks the current center position (estimated). The hatched area is the zone where that development could occur. There is also a mouseover text discussion for more details and to get the percentage chance.

There is a five-day version as well.

I think this is probably the most useful thing to look at probably every day during the hurricane season.

And what this is saying is there’s a disturbance at the position of the orange x as of Monday morning.

And it has a medium chance of developing in the hatched area in the next five days, so we’ve got two disturbances again that we’re watching.

And there is a medium chance they could become tropical depressions or storms over the next five days as they track toward the west, in those orange hatched areas.

So as of Monday, we you know, we have a couple of storms, we’re disturbances we’re watching.

By the time of this workshop, it’s possible one or both of them could be tropical storms or even hurricanes.

And you can see there’s potential they could ultimately head into the Gulf.

So we are indeed in the peak of the hurricane season, it’s good to be aware of what’s going on out there. And you access this@hurricanes.gov.

Be ready for Hurricane Season. Before the 2020 hurricane season, there are actions you can take to be ready. Today you can: Make a list of supplies for your hurricane kit. Check to see what you already have. Restock during the next several weeks. Organize important documents and confirm coverage with your insurance agency. Determine if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone. Make a plan of action with multiple options. While preparing for hurricane season, follow the latest health guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.

Be ready for Hurricane Season. Before the 2020 hurricane season, there are actions you can take to be ready. Today you can: Make a list of supplies for your hurricane kit. Check to see what you already have. Restock during the next several weeks. Organize important documents and confirm coverage with your insurance agency. Determine if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone. Make a plan of action with multiple options. While preparing for hurricane season, follow the latest health guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.

How do we get ready?

Really all of us, our families, our businesses, good to have a kit of supplies. In case we get a hurricane, whether we stay in place or we evacuated, it’s good to have a kit that you can draw from.

It’s good to have your important documents in order and confirm your coverage with your insurance agency.

One thing you really want to do is make sure you have flood insurance, which is not covered by your standard homeowners’ insurance.

And for those that have maintaining collections.

You know the insurance could also be a very important element and then determine if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone.

If so, what are your plans? Where will you go? Where will you evacuate?

Determine Your Risk. Hurricanes bring many hazards to U.S. coastlines and inland areas, including storm surge along the coast, inland flooding due to heavy rainfall, tornadoes, strong wind, rip currents, and large waves. While preparing for hurricane season, follow the latest health guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.

Determine Your Risk. Hurricanes bring many hazards to U.S. coastlines and inland areas, including storm surge along the coast, inland flooding due to heavy rainfall, tornadoes, strong wind, rip currents, and large waves. While preparing for hurricane season, follow the latest health guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.

Determine your risk.

This is a very important aspect of both home and business, and for those that are maintaining collections, what is the risk for these different hazards for your location.

If you are an evacuation zone, you’re going to want to have that evacuation plan.


Develop an Evacuation Plan. Find out today if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone and determine who issues evacuation orders for your area. Plan for multiple options on where you would go and how you would get there. Leave immediately if ordered to evacuate and be sure to plan for your pets.

Develop an Evacuation Plan. Find out today if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone and determine who issues evacuation orders for your area—plan for multiple options on where you would go and how you would get there. Leave immediately if ordered to evacuate, and be sure to plan for your pets.

First, find out if you’re in an evacuation zone.

Plan your route out.

Follow evacuation orders plan for your pets, which normally takes your pets with you when you evacuate.


And Texas does maintain maps of evacuation routes.

These are suggested routes you can take that the state will support as far as gasoline and supplies and things like that.

So these are the routes in blue that they would like you to take. On this website, you can find maps for the whole state of Texas.

What about those blue-white dashed lines as a last resort? The state can enact contraflow for those areas, meaning routing all traffic outbound, and that’s kind of a last resort.

Kind of if we have a Rita type evacuation where the roads are jammed, and you know we need to turn everyone outbound on those routes.

Assemble Disaster Supplies. Make a list of items to replenish your hurricane supplies and begin to assemble them before hurricane season begins. Have enough food and water for each person for at least three days. Be sure to fill your prescriptions and have medicine on hand. Radios, batteries, and phone chargers are also must-haves. Gas up your vehicle and have extra cash on hand. Food/Water; Medicine; Batteries, Radio, Chargers, Gas Up, Cash on Hand. While preparing for hurricane season, follow the latest health guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.

Assemble Disaster Supplies. Make a list of items to replenish your hurricane supplies and begin to assemble them before hurricane season begins. Have enough food and water for each person for at least three days. Be sure to fill your prescriptions and have medicine on hand. Radios, batteries, and phone chargers are also must-haves. Gas up your vehicle and have extra cash on hand. Food/Water; Medicine; Batteries, Radio, Chargers, Gas Up, Cash on Hand. While preparing for hurricane season, follow the latest health guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.

Mentioned disaster supplies what goes in your kit, certainly food, and water, non-perishable food items, medicines, batteries, radios chargers.

Make sure it’s good to keep your gas tank more than half full during the night.

Hurricane season, as we know, you know if we lose power, it can be hard to find gas and then have extra cash on hand.


Emergency Supplies List.

Emergency Supplies List.

This is just a more lengthy list of the types of things that you can put in your emergency supply list.

Of course, with the Coronavirus this year, you know, it’s good to have masks with you.

Sanitizer and, you know, always keeping social distancing in mind as well.

And then it’s good to check with your agent on your insurance.

Do you have adequate insurance?

Do you have flood insurance? Flood insurance is subsidized by the federal government. National Flood Insurance Program. And even if you’re not in a flood zone, given the amounts of rain we can get here in Texas, for most of us, flood insurance is really going to be a bargain.

You know, given that you can be made whole, mostly after an event like Harvey, if you don’t have flood insurance, it’s much harder to recover.

And so I know we have a lot of folks maintaining collections, artifacts, museums, and we have a couple of examples where hurricanes came into play, maybe damaging collections.

I was actually working in southeast Virginia in 2005.

And we had Hurricane Isabel, and Isabel created tremendous storm surge and actually damaged a lot of the archaeological collection at Jamestown.

So there was a case where a lot of artifacts were stored in a search zone at a fairly low elevation.

And if, if the folks knew the risk that it would have been a simple matter to move those items, or at least store at higher locations, more secure areas, outside of the search zone.

So there was one case where this kind of came into play and the Caribbean, another news story here about museums in the Caribbean, and the actions taken by museums to keep those treasures safe in those museums. So there was a situation where actions were taken and protected some of those really valuable treasures.

So the general takeaways for folks maintaining collections understand the risks of vulnerabilities to win search and Rainfall flooding where the collections are stored.

Try mitigation measures to limit the risk store in a more sturdy structure, higher elevation outside surge in flood zones, etc.

And you can also look at search, excuse me, rainfall risk maps as well flooding rainfall risk maps that FEMA maintains to help assess that part of the hazard risk.

Just finishing up now, what is the forecast for this hurricane season? NOAA is forecasting the possibility of an extremely active season.

You can see 19 to 25 named storms. The average is 12.

So and then on the left-hand column, you can see the name storms we’ve already had in you know, we’re only in early August. So we’re well on our way to getting up into that 19 to 25 name storm range.

Interestingly, if we go over into 21, we run out of names. If that’s the case, the Greek alphabet is used. And this only happened one other time back in 2005, where we had so many storms, we had to use Greek letters like alpha, beta, and so on. The final slide here.

It’s important to follow trusted sources, you know, nowadays on the web on social media, you know, there’s a lot of so-called experts out there, putting a lot of information about everything, including weather, and I would really encourage you to follow us at the National Weather Service.

You can see our website, our Twitter and Facebook feed there. Also, the National Hurricane Center has a great website and social media feeds just to get kind of trusted information. The local stations also are very good as well. So but just be wary of a lot of information out there. That might not be accurate.

Well, thank you, Dan. Thank you. Do you want to add anything before we move on to Jason?

Just quickly, we actually have two tropical depressions out there now, including one that was just defined as a depression in the Caribbean.

So, you know, areas along the Texas Louisiana Gulf Coast, in general, need to be wary of that. It looks like it’ll come up our way along about Tuesday or Wednesday of next week.

So we have a storm, a real threat.

There’s another one that’s headed more towards Florida.

So keep that website in mind. hurricanes.gov


And okay, thanks so much, Dan.

I’m so glad that we’ve made connections and love having you as a resource.

Knowing that you’re out there is is a great source of comfort in and improves our sense of security as we get try to deal with all of this.


Preparedness for Cultural Institutions

I think we move on now to our next speaker, who is Jason Church.

Jason is Chief of Technical Services at NCPTT.

Many of us know Jason and worked with him for years.

He is…he coordinates and works to further develop the Center’s National Cemetery Training Initiative, which I’ve taken part in, and I could recommend highly it’s an incredible resource and much needed.

And he does other related research with that, but he has his fingers and a lot of pies.

Before joining NCPTT, he was a conservator and historic metals expert for the city of Savannah, Georgia.

In the Department of Cemeteries, he’s earned an MFA in Historic Preservation from Savannah College of Art and Design {indistinguishable} Science from Appalachian State University.

Jason is a professional associate of the American Institute for Conservation and an active member of the National Heritage Responders.

So Jason is assisted with disaster response recovery for some of our most devastating storms over the years as a volunteer for this National Heritage Responders.

And I believe that he’s going to have a lot of information to share with us, and at this point, I’ll turn it over to Jason.


Preparedness for Cultural Institutions

Preparedness for Cultural Institutions

For the visually impaired, The following is a slide-based presentation. All materials used are available for download in your WebEx browser.

Hello, my name is Jason Church, and I’m with the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training.

And today, I’m going to talk about preparedness for cultural institutions.


Be proactive, not reactive.

Be proactive, not reactive.

So in this presentation, we’re going to talk about what you, as an institution, can do to better prepare your collections and yourself . And you’re building for disasters or emergencies.

Alright, so my favorite saying is to be proactive, not reactive.

As my father always said, the best defense is a good offense.


Facing the Unthinkable; Planning, Types of Emergencies and Disasters, Emergency Preparedness, Health and Safety, Response and Triage

Facing the Unthinkable; Planning, Types of Emergencies and Disasters, Emergency Preparedness, Health, and Safety, Response, and Triage

And that’s very, very true for collections.

So we want to be prepared and ready as best we can before anything happens.

Because if we wait till after it’s happened, we’re already behind.

Alright, so what happens when you have to face the unthinkable.

So, this is emotionally really, really difficult.

I’ve worked disasters, and I’ve had my own at my own with my own collections, and I know how emotionally draining and daunting this can be.


 Types of Emergencies and Disasters • Naturalvs.Manmade – Types – Unexpected vs. Anticipated

Types of Emergencies and Disasters; Natural vs. Manmade, Types, Unexpected vs. Anticipated

So we’re going to try our best to be proactive and ready.

So that helps a little bit.

Get over.

So when we walk into work, we have a scene like this. And by the way, this is a real institution.


Types of Emergencies and Disasters; Emergencies, High probability, Minor impact, Localized, Specific response, Disasters, Low probability, Catastrophic damage, Wider area involved, Most serious in densely populated areas, Multi-agency response

Types of Emergencies and Disasters; Emergencies, High probability, Minor impact, Localized, Specific response, Disasters, Low probability, Catastrophic damage, a Wider area involved, Most serious in densely populated areas, Multi-agency response

And that’s really their curation records.

What are we going to do?

So we’re going to talk a little bit about that.

And hopefully, in prior planning, we can be ready, or at least somewhat ready.

So the first thing we’re talking about is types of emergencies and disasters, man-made versus natural, unexpected, anticipated, or just totally out of nowhere.


Types of Emergencies and Disasters: Man-made, Accidents, Systems failure, Plumbing leaks, Arson, explosion, Robbery, theft, Vandalism, terrorism Natural: Severe storms, Floods, Earthquakes, Lightning, wild fires, Heat waves, Pest infestations

Types of Emergencies and Disasters: Man-made, Accidents, Systems failure, Plumbing leaks, Arson, explosion, Robbery, theft, Vandalism, terrorism
Natural: Severe storms, Floods, Earthquakes, Lightning, wildfires, Heatwaves, Pest infestations

So for some things like a large scale event like wildfire, or hurricane, we can sort of plan to that we know areas that might be at risk, we can see imminent danger coming sometimes.

And then other times, for example, a photograph of me, draining water from a photography collection is just those emergencies that happen when a water main breaks overnight and fills up {indistinguishable} with 10 feet of water overnight.

And these things happen. So what are we going to do about it?

The reality is with emergencies. They’re highly probable. It’s probably going to happen at some point.

Are you going to know what to do?

The advantage of emergencies is their usually minor impact localized.

And the positive thing is you’re probably the only institution around that’s had this issue. So when that happens, you’ve got a greater chance of volunteers coming in or services being available to local conservators, I can come over.

Whereas if there’s a large scale disaster, everyone’s in trouble.

Everyone’s got their own collection to worry about.


Types of UNEXPECTED NO WARNING and ANTICIPATED CAN BE PLANNED FOR Emergencies Disasters: Fire, Tornado, Conduciveconditionsknown, Flash flood, Power failure, Explosion, Earthquake, Vandalism, theft, Thunderstorms,lightning, Wildfire, Snow and ice storms, Flooding, Hurricane

Types of UNEXPECTED NO WARNING and ANTICIPATED CAN BE PLANNED FOR Emergencies Disasters: Fire, Tornado, Conducive conditions known, Flash flood, Power failure, Explosion, Earthquake, Vandalism, theft, Thunderstorms,lightning, Wildfire, Snow and ice storms, Flooding, Hurricane.

You’ve got every tree crew in town is busy, fire, police, all of these institutions are busy—servers running everywhere.

They’re trying to secure their own home, that sort of thing.

So we really, really need to plan ahead for disasters because so many things won’t be available to you when that happens.

And it could be something very minor, for example, my photograph here.


EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS: Planning, Risk assessment, What is vulnerable?, Mitigation prior to disaster or emergency – Disaster plan

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS: Planning, Risk assessment, What is vulnerable?, Mitigation prior to disaster or emergency – Disaster plan

This is a local church that I had to that I went and helped with, that just had the problem that their air conditioning got off, and all of a sudden they had mold bloom in the building, and they definitely weren’t expecting it, and it adversely affected both woodwork and works of art.

Something that no one was ready for.


RISK ASSESSMENT: How much of my stuff is at risk? – What do I have?, Artwork, Artifacts, Business paperwork – loan/gallery agreements, inventories, photographic records: back it up OFF-SITE! What is it made of? Some materials are more vulnerable to certain risks than others.

RISK ASSESSMENT: How much of my stuff is at risk? – What do I have?, Artwork, Artifacts, Business paperwork – loan/gallery agreements, inventories, photographic records: back it up OFF-SITE! What is it made of? Some materials are more vulnerable to certain risks than others.

So some of the men made disasters or emergencies, of course, plumbing leaks.

That’s a bad one.

I don’t have it on here, but HVAC failures. For example, the air conditioning that I just talked about.

Or there’s a famous museum that you think was written about a few years ago where they had a furnace that blew soot back into the collections through the HPC system.

And of course, accidents that could be trained derailing car accidents, things like that, of course, system failures.

That’s the HVAC I talked about.

Robbery, theft, vandalism, all of these are real things that could happen at any time.


Collection Materials. From most vulnerable to least vulnerable: Paper, books and parchment, Textiles, Leather,ivory,shell, Mixed materials objects, Paintings on canvas, Wood veneer,gilt and painted surfaces, Photographs and films, Sound and video recordings, Ferrous metals, Porous stone and ceramics, Glass and non-porous ceramics, Nonferrous metals

Collection Materials. From most vulnerable to least vulnerable: Paper, books and parchment, Textiles, Leather,ivory,shell, Mixed materials objects, Paintings on canvas, Wood veneer,gilt and painted surfaces, Photographs and films, Sound and video recordings, Ferrous metals, Porous stone and ceramics, Glass and non-porous ceramics, Nonferrous metals

So what are we thinking about doing to prepare for those, and of course, natural disasters, floods and earthquakes and hurricanes, and wildfires?

And one thing that we don’t talk about very often, but pest infestations, and sometimes these things are actually coming together.

Unfortunately, they stack. I know I did a lot of work in Puerto Rico after hurricanes, and we had huge roving groups of termites that came into museums.

In the aftermath of the hurricane that we didn’t expect, so museums that had fantastic facilities all of a sudden had termite infestations inside their collections inside their buildings.

Because termites were looking for new homes, they were moving around with the flooding and that sort of thing.

So sometimes these actually stagger and come in together.

So what can be playing for?


 RISK ASSESSMENT • What is the most important to me? – Create a priority list • Monetary value • Research value • Historic or sentimental value

RISK ASSESSMENT
• What is most important to me? – Create a priority list
• Monetary value
• Research value
• Historic or sentimental value

Personally, I have thought, now that a rethink this slide, I think it all can be playing for, to some extent.

So things like power failures. Do we have a backup plan for that? You may have a collection that’s so sensitive that a minor power failure could personally affect some of the collections.

So that’s a really important thing.

That’s something that maybe it’s not expected. Maybe it’s not anticipated, but we could definitely play. We can have a backup system for that.

Alright, so in planning what’s most vulnerable?

If we’re looking at our collection, and we’re thinking about our institution, what is the thing that we’re most concerned with?

What is our biggest priority?


 RISK ASSESSMENT • Whatisthelikelihoodofadisaster occurring? – Know your building! • Fire alarms? Sprinkler systems? • Are you in a flood zone? Basement level? • Where are the shut offs? • Is there chemical storage? Where is it located? • Back-up power?

RISK ASSESSMENT
• What is the likelihood of a disaster occurring?
– Know your building!
• Fire alarms? Sprinkler
systems?
• Are you in a flood zone? Basement level?
• Where are the shutoffs?
• Is there chemical storage?
Where is it located?
• Back-up power?

Is there any way to prepare for that with an oncoming disaster?

Do we have any sort of disaster plan?

So, for example, I was on the emergency response team for the city of Savannah, Georgia, for the Department of cemeteries.

There’s nothing we can do, of course, for the hundreds of thousands of headstones and sculptures that we have, but one of our biggest risks is all the burial records.

So what do we do with those if hurricanes coming?

So they have a disaster plan their plan, all of the records are stored in fire-safety, they actually go into a trailer, and they go to Thomasville, Georgia.

And that’s where they stay with two employees during a hurricane.

There’s nothing we can do about our, you know, amazing sculpture collection.


 PLANNING • Contact List – Building manager – Preparedness team/friends • Inventory and Priority List • List of materials and supplies • Backup storage/triage areas • Professional help

PLANNING
• Contact List
– Building manager
– Preparedness team/friends
• Inventory and Priority List
• List of materials and supplies • Backup storage/triage areas • Professional help

But we can do something about our most vulnerable asset, and that is the burial records.

So what does our collection entail?

What do we have?

What kind of artifacts or artwork?

We talked here about business paperwork. Do you have the inventories, photographic records, loan agreements, things that your inventory that shows what’s yours, what’s on loan?

Those are really important.

Do you have them backed up?

Do you have digital copies?

One of the things we found during Hurricane Katrina and Rita is a lot of institutions did have electronic backups, and hard drive backups are server backups.


But unfortunately, a lot of times, those backups were still located in the same building.

If your building is hit hard enough, that’s probably not a good place for you to be.

So do you have them backed up off-site?

Do you have them on the cloud, or in a server somewhere else, you can rent server space. There are lots of companies out there that will sell you server space or rent server space that you can pick down located completely on the other side of the country or far away from where you might be adversely affected.


WORKING WITH EMERGENCY RESPONDERS: TIPS FOR CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS, Understand chain of command, Identify ways your institution can help, Table top exercise with local emergency management agency, Appoint liaison and provide blueprints

WORKING WITH EMERGENCY RESPONDERS: TIPS FOR CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS, Understand the chain of command, Identify ways your institution can help, Tabletop exercise with a local emergency management agency, Appoint liaison and provide blueprints

So, for example, if you live in the Gulf Coast, if you’re in a hurricane-prone area, you’re gonna want to backup all your digital records to somewhere completely else in the country.

So is there any way that you could do digital copies of some of your most important paperwork, photographic records, review, artists, interviews, that sort of thing.

So that should be a high priority to start.

Of course, they’re not ever going to be as important as the original, but having backups and things like that, that is was vulnerable.

And we talked about the collections.

You know, there are some things that are very vulnerable.

Hey, for boats, parchment, photographs, mixed media objects, things that, you know, one type of material expands and attracts a different rate due to temperature shifts or water, are they going to separate.


BUILDING / SITE REENTRY • Structural • Electrical (livewires) • Gaslines • Carbon Monoxide • Water • Biological material(e.g.mold, pathogens) • Pesticides and chemicals, including solvents Personal safety is paramount! Remember you are not replaceable!

BUILDING / SITE REENTRY
• Structural
• Electrical (livewires)
• Gas lines
• Carbon Monoxide
• Water
• Biological material(e.g.mold, pathogens)
• Pesticides and chemicals, including solvents
Personal safety is paramount! Remember, you are not replaceable!

So these are the kind of things that we really need to look at.

And consider those are the most important.

We need backup plans for how to prepare if water intrusion or the HVC fails or things like that. As opposed to myself as a conservator, I work luckily on the very bottom of this list.

You know, I work with metals, and I work with outdoor sculpture, things like that.

So, a lot of times I’ll get called to institutions or after disasters and, you know, I’m, I’m the person with good news to say, “Oh, you’re bronzes, they’re going to be just fine. Let’s wash them off later. You should go worried about those paintings that you have.”

So, you know, if your institution has a large outdoor sculpture garden and it gets flooded, probably not a big issue, we’re probably going to be okay with that.

And of course, you know, your, your veneered furniture, period furniture, we need to get that drying as soon as we can.


 BUILDING / SITE REENTRY • Remember your training • Don’t go alone • Practice good hygiene – Wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) – Wash hands frequently – Bring clothes to change into before going home • Stay hydrated and alleviate stress • Document

BUILDING / SITE REENTRY
• Remember your training
• Don’t go alone
• Practice good hygiene
– Wear Personal Protective
Equipment (PPE)
– Wash hands frequently
– Bring clothes to change into before going home
• Stay hydrated and alleviate stress • Document

So thinking about a sort of triage and priority for your actual collection.

And of course, you know, I’ve talked about materials but just as important is what is most important to your collection?

Are you a collection that specializes in a certain type of art or type of artifacts are those the most important.

Do they have high monetary value maybe researched? {indistinguishable} I know a lot of institutions I’ve talked to and worked with in the past. Their most important objects in the entire collection are those that are on loan too.

So really figuring out like, what’s the most important thing?

How are you going to deal with that?

If a disaster is coming or if there is an emergency in that gallery or in the building, you know, sort of prioritize what that is.

And you know, a lot of times when we’re looking at triage, and we’re coming in after a disaster.


 AFTERWARDS 1. Documentation 2. Prioritization and Plan 3. Movement 4. Triage 5. Stabilization/Drying 6. Storage 7. Long Term Salvage

AFTERWARDS
1. Documentation
2. Prioritization and Plan
3. Movement
4. Triage
5. Stabilization/Drying
6. Storage
7. Long Term Salvage

It’s very daunting, you…everything is moved around, everything is damaged.

And I’ve worked in institutions where they’re. They’re worried about books and you. You have to say, you know, all these are commercially available, just walk out of this room and forget it.

None of this stuff matters.

It’s hard to get your mind wrapped around that when you’re looking at in floodwaters have been in everything swirling around.

Your records, oh, those are backed up, just walk out of the room, don’t worry about it.

We need to go into the gallery and worry about the works of art, or the paintings that aren’t commercially available that are then one-offs that are one of the time works of art.

Those are, of course, the most important thing, maybe historic artifacts, you know, whatever it is.


 WE ARE THERE WHEN YOU NEED US!

WE ARE THERE WHEN YOU NEED US!

And that sounds weird, you know, how are we going to prioritize your life’s work as a curator or you know, as an institution head, but we have to because when the time comes, there may be only certain things that we need to work on or that can be salvaged.

So know your building, think about your building.

Think about the worst-case scenario; how is our building going to handle that?

This is a good example.

This is an institution that we worked at, and right by the most important records were louvered windows that all blew open and blew out during the hurt came.

So lots of water damage.

No one really thought about that.

So are you in a flood zone?

Is everything stored in the basement?

We see that a lot.

Where are the shutoffs?

Is that giant pipe that runs right through the gallery?

Is that the main water supply for the whole building?

It could be.

So think about these kinds of things sort of walk your building and think about worst-case scenarios.

You know, what could happen here?

I know, for example, in my own institution where I work, we have emergency air vents, more than once now, in a storm, the louvers for those blow open, and it rains and floods right directly beneath those emergency air vents.

We didn’t know that the first time it happened.

Things were damaged.

Now we know if there’s an imminent disaster, everything moves away from the servants. Actually, now nothing is stored near them. But it’s sort of that thought process.

What’s the worst thing that could happen in this building?

Can we prepare?

Okay, so planning, remember, proactive, not reactive.

So do we have a disaster plan?

Does everyone know the disaster plan?

Maybe you have one, and only a couple of people even know about it.

Have you trained all the staff involved?

Are there supplies for that?

Are other groups that need to be involved?

Have you told them like your local fire department or your local police department? Do you have a working relationship with them?

One of the greatest disaster plans I’ve ever seen is in the state of Texas by Weeden House Museum. I did my emergency training there. And they were explaining that not only, of course, this is a very important Weeden House Museum, but their gardens are really important to them.

So they already have a contract in place with a tree company that has their emergency plan, that tree company has all the information they need.

So if something happens, that tree company already knows what’s important what to do, you know, that takes a lot of prior planning.

So talk to the people that might be involved, the people you want to be involved.

Maybe there’s a very large paper or book collection. Maybe you need to go ahead and contact these large firms that freeze and can transport materials to talk to them and say, we’re in a hurricane-prone area, we’re in a flood-prone area.

We just want you to know who we are and what we have.

A lot of them will actually send someone out, photograph and talk with you and help you come up with a game plan.

In case they’re needed in the future.

Hopefully, none of this is ever needed.

But if it is, you won’t know who to call and not.

This will let me start googling companies that will come and haul off and freeze and dry our paper objects.

You want to already know that.

And it’s really important if to come up with a disaster plan to train your staff and to inform everybody because the worst thing you want is after a hurricane or after a large disaster, you don’t want every volunteer museum showing up.

And we’re talking a minute why you don’t want them all showing up.

But you want to know that they know oh, this isn’t my job.

My job is to wait until they call me, or my job is to show up immediately because I’m the first responder to get there.

And just figuring out what damage there is and, and what to do.

So contact list.

And of course, we all have an amazing computer in our pocket that has our phone, and our contacts already hit it, and our camera all that’s in our phones now.

But the reality is for those who have lived through large-scale hurricanes, that phone may not work at all. You may be out of power now I’ve lost my contacts.

I don’t know Steve’s number.

I only have it on my phone.

Or I don’t know, you people who work for these numbers.

I have a contact list with everyone’s job on it so that everyone knows I’m not supposed to do anything unless I get this call or Yes, my job is to show up.

For example, when I was on the emergency response team in Savannah, hurricane warning came out when it hit a certain level of warning.

I knew my job was to grab my drop bag and to go to the cemetery.

I knew my jobs. No one had to tell me is it all the practiced. I knew what my job was.

I knew where my supplies were.

If your first responder into your institution, you may want to consider having all of your equipment, of course, at home, your institution gets hit.

That TV is probably gone now.

So, for example, I’m on the FAA ICS emergency response team, the National Heritage responders.

My drop bag is actually in my attic.

I put it there in the case for some reason. My house ever floods all my people. I know it safely stored Tyvek respirator N95 that’s ready in case I have to go somewhere, including my own institution.

So, of course, one of the most important things dplan.org. I highly recommend that everyone.

Go check this out.

Make an emergency plan for your institution via a very small one or a very large one.

D Plan is amazing.

Walks you through how to do all of the stuff we’re talking about. So please, please check.

Another good resource I mentioned earlier, of course, is FDIC and AIC. This is a great resource page. If you hit that QR code right there, it’ll take you to it.

But working with emergency responders, does your local police or fire department know the kind of collections that you have and how your institution is on the inside?

For example, I’m working with our fire inspector every few years.

I explain where all of our stuff is stored all of our gas tanks and solvents and that in case we ever have a disaster.

I don’t want them walking into a blank slate I want them to already know.

Okay, in these rooms, active really careful. We have lots of gas cylinders and that sort of thing.

All right. So one of the most important things, as I wrap up, is to think about is building reentry.

A lot of people don’t think about this. It’s all about the collections.

But afterwards, can you get back in? I talked about sort of having PP at home if you can.

But having someone who is a first responder for your institution with the knowledge to know, this building is not structurally sound anymore.

I’m sorry, we’re done. We can’t go in.

You know, you’re the most important part of this.

You’re not replaceable.

I know the collections are really, really important there.

A lot of times, this our entire life’s work.

You know, our passion and our obsession are the collections.

We have to really be careful and remember how important we are, and our employees are.

So having someone on staff who knows how to turn the gas off to the ability, how do we turn the wire the electrical off the building?

I bet a lot of employees don’t know this, which really Important whoever is those first, whoever those first responders are, that they know how to tell the building structurally sound?

How do we access galleries and access floors without elevator, all of those things, and sort of wrapping up?

You know, we come up with a disaster plan, train your staff, at least once a year, in prepping this, I realized we have new employees at my own institution that I know I’ve never gone over this with and I feel guilty of that, like, oh, I’m supposed to be teaching this.

I’m not doing a good job.

We need to do this again.

So that they all know how do we turn the electrical off?

How do we turn the gas off?

Do you have PPE?

Where do all of our most important assets, our original lab notebooks, where do those go?

If a storm is coming?

So remember your training, don’t do it by yourself.

You know, always work in a buddy system wait for someone else of two people entering the building at all.

Time makes sure that someone knows that you’ve gone to the building and that you’re going into the building before you do.

Of course, we talked about PPE.

And of course, if you’re in there, maybe this is the only time you get in for a long time to document it a brand camera with you bring your phone with you, anything that you can do to document the condition.

And the things that you see. That’s going to be really important for planning. They’re also gonna be really important.

As I said, what if you are able to go in but no one’s ability to go in for another few days because of another emergency where the building is deemed unsafe, you’ll be able to know what’s going on.

And of course, coming up with that prioritization plan of your collection.

Where is it going to go?

Do you have a place that you could dry it or store it?

Do you have a long term salvage plan?

Have you talked to other entities have you talked to professional companies.

Do you have conservators that you work with that you could call it this time? So all these things need to be in your preservation plan in your disaster plan.

I want to throw the last plugin here where they already need us.

As I mentioned earlier, I’m a member of the National Heritage responders.

So that number is an important one.

That is a 24-hour hotline that’s managed by volunteers. If you have a disaster, by all means, call us. It doesn’t matter if it’s two in the morning and the floodwaters are receding. Give us a call.

We’re here to help you in any way that we can. Sometimes it’s deployment, sometimes putting you in touch with the people in your area that can help you but whatever we can do, and maybe it’s just answering a simple question for you. But we’re there for you. We want to help you.

So thank you very much, and I hope you got something out of this. I know I’ve got a lot of our other speakers here.


2020 Hurricane Preparations Webinar

And now I’d like to turn to our last speaker, Melody Gayeski.

Melody’s with the American Red Cross. She’s been a volunteer for over 20 years.

She’s actually the second generation in her family to volunteer with them, as her mother taught swimming and lifeguard certification as a Red Cross volunteer in San Diego while Melody was growing up.

Well, after a long career in financial services and 20 years with IBM, Melody retired in 2013 and began her journey as a disaster relief work for me.

Melody is a member of the Disaster Relief Management Team we call upon to deploy across the nation when disasters occur. Our most recent assignment was on the team that responded to support those impacted by Hurricane Hannah in South Texas. I’d like to turn the webinar over to Melody.


For the visually impaired, the following video features presenter Melody Gayeski. All materials used in the video will be available for download in your WebEx browser.

2020 Hurricane Preparations Webinar; Overview: Preparing for the SAFE Delivery of Mass Care Services during a Pandemic; Presenter: Melody Gayeski, Leadership Volunteer Austin, Texas; August 20, 2020

2020 Hurricane Preparations Webinar; Overview: Preparing for the Safe Delivery of Mass Care Services during a Pandemic; Presenter: Melody Gayeski, Leadership Volunteer Austin, Texas; August 20, 2020

Hello, everyone. Welcome to the 2020 Hurricane Preparations Webinar. My name is Melody Gayeski.

And I’m a leadership volunteer with the American Red Cross in Austin, Texas.

And today, I’m here to share with you a little bit about the Red Cross, what we do in times of disaster and how we’ve modified our processes to ensure that our volunteers, our workers, and our clients remain safe while we deliver services during the COVID 19 pandemic.


The American Red Cross provides services across the country. Texas is part of the Southwest and Rocky Mountain Division (seen in orange). (Map of the United States divided into regions by color.) Texas is Divided into three (3) Regions: North Texas, Central & South Texas, The Gulf Coast

The American Red Cross provides services across the country. Texas is part of the Southwest and Rocky Mountain Division (seen in orange). (Map of the United States divided into regions by color.) Texas is divided into three (3) Regions: North Texas, Central & South Texas, The Gulf Coast

So the next slide you’re going To see is a picture of the United States.

We have offices throughout all of the United States and its territories.

We respond over 62,000 times a year, just helping people whose homes have caught on fire.

And that’s a usually very, very local response.

And then it can grow into a national response, such as what we saw a few years ago with Hurricane Harvey in Texas.

Currently, we have operations actually in South Texas with Hurricane Hannah, along with the Midwest, with the recent straight winds.

We have flooding operations ongoing on the East Coast due to the most recent tropical storm, and we are responding to wildfires in California as well.

So you can see that there is a lot going on in the disaster business.

There are other things the Red Cross does in terms of supporting the armed services. We perform international messaging.

There are a number of things that we do that we’ll not be talking about today.

But I want to just share with you a little bit about how we’re modifying our processes.


(Photo of Clara Barton edited to add a "Red Cross" symbol mask, Founder) For over 138 years, the Red Cross has cared about others. Our #1 Priority Is the safety of our Workforce, Volunteers, Partners and Clients Keeping shelter residents and workforce safe in a shelter during COVID requires some adjustments to procedures. Recommendations follow Center of Disease Control (CDC) Guidance and best Public Health Practices.

(Photo of Clara Barton edited to add a “Red Cross” symbol mask, Founder)
For over 138 years, the Red Cross has cared about others. Our #1 Priority
Is the safety of our Workforce, Volunteers, Partners, and Clients
Keeping shelter residents and the workforce safe in a shelter during COVID requires some adjustments to procedures.
Recommendations follow the Center for Disease Control (CDC) Guidance and best.
Public Health Practices.

So the next slide is a picture of our founder. We have been the American Red Cross for a little over 138 years. Clara Barton was a nurse, and she founded the organization.

We are a nonprofit. We’re not a government agency, but we partner a lot with local government, emergency management, along with faith-based organizations, and others in the community to make sure that we take care of people who are affected by disasters, for the sole purpose really of alleviating their suffering.

Their immediate suffering and making sure that they have a safe place to stay. They have food, and they have emergency supplies and some individual disaster care counseling services that we provide.

That’s going to be some limited medical support, along with trauma counseling, and even spiritual counseling.

And we want everyone to know that the services we provide are free, that comes from the generosity of our donors, and we are not funded by the government.

So with that, as an introduction, I want to take us into what we do in terms of sheltering.


Sheltering Options Non-Congregate Shelters – provided to individuals and families as sheltering using hotels, motels, campsites, trailers, RVs, college dormitories, retreat camps, etc. Provides better separation of living space and privacy Congregate Shelters – provided to individuals and families for group sheltering using community facilities such as community centers, gymnasiums, etc. and includes shelters of all sizes. It is preferable to open a higher number of low-occupancy shelters to accommodate appropriate social distancing Resource: Red Cross Shelter Guidelines: Description of Shelter Types pp. 85-86

Sheltering Options
Non-Congregate Shelters – provided to individuals and families as sheltering using hotels, motels, campsites, trailers, RVs, college dormitories, retreat camps, etc. Provides better separation of living space and privacy
Congregate Shelters – provided to individuals and families for group sheltering using community facilities such as community centers, gymnasiums, etc. and includes shelters of all sizes. It is preferable to open a higher number of low-occupancy shelters to accommodate appropriate social distancing
Resource: Red Cross Shelter Guidelines: Description of Shelter Types pp. 85-86

So the next slide talks about two different kinds of shelter.

One is non congregate sheltering, and that’s what we’re doing right now.

It’s unusual, you would not normally see this, but we are now sheltering people since the really the first quarter of this year in hotels.

Now, why are we doing that?

Clearly, we’re in a. We’re in a pandemic in a highly infectious environment.

And as a result, when people come and need housing from us, putting them all in a very large gymnasium or church is probably not the best alternative if there are other options available.

So we have begun sheltering people in hotel rooms as a family unit.

This allows them to be together.

It allows them to be separated and isolated from other families, as well as from our workers. And we found this to be very successful.

We have done this well over 20,000 times since the beginning of the year, and we will continue to do this as our preferred option.

We feed people three meals a day.

We take care of them, as I said, with individual disaster care services, and we connect them with broader services that are available through the government and other organizations in the community.

Usually, they only stay with us for a short time before they move on, and they’re recovering to a longer-term solution for their housing and other needs.


Congregate Shelters: Strategies to minimize spread of COVID-19 Strategies to minimize spread of COVID-19 Screening and access control with shelter entry barriers Increased sanitation activities Social distancing Isolation care area Smaller than normal staff Smaller client capacity The following supplies augment standard material resources to ensure safety to shelter residents and workers Protection N95 masks Face masks Screening Thermometers Isolation Care Gowns Goggles or Face Shields Gloves Cleaning Hand sanitizers Hand soaps Cleaning wipes (like Clorox wipes) Resource: Red Cross Shelter Guidelines COVID-19 Supplies and Kits: pp. 28-31; COVID-19 Non-Congregate Sheltering pp. 90-99

Congregate Shelters: Strategies to minimize the spread of COVID-19
Strategies to minimize the spread of COVID-19
Screening and access control with shelter entry barriers
Increased sanitation activities
Social distancing
Isolation care area
Smaller than normal staff
Smaller client capacity
The following supplies augment standard material resources to ensure safety to shelter residents and workers.
Protection
N95 masks
Face masks
Screening
Thermometers
Isolation Care
Gowns
Goggles or Face Shields
Gloves
Cleaning
Hand sanitizers
Hand soaps
Cleaning wipes (like Clorox wipes)
Resource: Red Cross Shelter Guidelines COVID-19 Supplies and Kits: pp. 28-31; COVID-19 Non-Congregate Sheltering pp. 90-99

So the next thing you’ll see on that slide is congregating sheltering.

That’s what you’re most commonly have seen with the Red Cross on television.

When you see cots and blankets and people all in a very large facility staying together.

There are times when we will still need to use this option.

For instance, when evacuations for large hurricanes and we have thousands of people leaving the coast coming inland.

There are oftentimes not sufficient hotel rooms for that first couple of days that people just need to get away from the threat. So we have modified our congregate sheltering processes a bit. Instead of just taking on anyone, we usually assign about 40 square feet per person. We’ve now extended that to 110.

Now what that means is we can’t get the same number of people in a facility, which means we need more facilities, more people to be in the field supporting them.

And our goal is to get them migrated out of that congregate shelter into a non-congregate hotel room or some other option.

I forgot to mention to you that we have used hotel rooms, but we also use RVs. We use campgrounds, cabins, whatever is going to provide a safe lodging alternative for the community while we’re supporting them in their early stages of recovery.


Screening & Shelter Flow (Diagram showing the workflow of screening for COVID) Tornado/Flood/Fire Event caused need for emergency sheltering Plan for less than 14 days Align with Public Health guidance Symptomatic: Isolation Care Area Residents who Develop Symptoms, Suspected or are Confirmed COVID + (Barrier/Door) Screening Process Temperature and Questions Public Health Screeners One-Way Drop-Off of Supplies (Shelter cannot be opened until isolation care area is resourced and operational) No Symptoms (Barrier/Door) Shelter Registration Shelter Size = 50 clients maximum 110 sq ft per client Cots 6-ft apart (families stay together) Everyone leaving shelter site Is rescreened upon return Shelter Workers 6-10 in-person workers Shelterees may be part of workforce Pets are not allowed in dormitory Pets (Animal Services) in a separate facility Screen everyone, including visitors and staff, prior to entering shelter Control shelter entrance and exit 24/7 to ensure everyone gets screened Assign trained screeners (Licensing not required) Resource: Red Cross Shelter Guidelines COVID-19 Shelter Health Screening Area pp. 93-94

Screening & Shelter Flow (Diagram showing the workflow of screening for COVID)
Tornado/Flood/Fire
The event caused the need for emergency shelter
Plan for less than 14 days
Align with Public Health guidance
Symptomatic: Isolation Care Area Residents who Develop Symptoms, Suspected or are Confirmed COVID + (Barrier/Door)
Screening Process Temperature and Questions Public Health Screeners
One-Way Drop-Off of Supplies (Shelter cannot be opened until the isolation care area is resourced and operational)
No Symptoms (Barrier/Door)
Shelter Registration
Shelter Size = 50 clients maximum 110 sq ft per client
Cots 6-ft apart (families stay together)
Everyone leaving the shelter site Is rescreened upon return
Shelter Workers
6-10 in-person workers Shelterees maybe
part of workforce
Pets are not allowed in the dormitory
Pets (Animal Services) in a separate facility
Screen everyone, including visitors and staff, prior to entering the shelter
Control shelter entrance and exit 24/7 to ensure everyone gets screened
Assign trained screeners (Licensing not required)
Resource:
Red Cross Shelter Guidelines
COVID-19 Shelter Health Screening Area pp. 93-94

So we’re going to go to the next slide, which is going to describe a little bit more about what we’ve done.

Done to make sure that if we do provide a congregate shelter, that we provide it in a way that is safe.

So the first thing is that we have issued protective. You hear the term PGE, which is a piece of protective gear equipment. For people, all of our workers and our clients receive masks and gloves. We have increased our cleaning processes. We are maintaining social distancing whenever possible.

We are also going through a screening process, which I’m going to show you in a minute. That ensures that no one enters a shelter without being health screened.

And if they leave the shelter for some reason, they will be screened every time they reenter.

And that is done on a daily basis for our workers and multiple times during the day for our clients.

If we determine that someone has a symptom that where they need to be looked after for a while to determine how serious those symptoms are, we will divert them into an isolation area.

So we will still house them and shelter them and feed them, but they will be put into an area that is being supported by either the public health department or our health services volunteers.

We will then monitor their symptoms and determine whether they actually have COVID, in which case we’ll work with public health to get them quarantined, or in the event that they just had an allergy attack or something of that nature or got overheated because it’s 110 outside, then we make sure that they’re stable and not symptomatic, in which case they would then be allowed to rejoin their family and enter the congregate shelter environment.

So the next thing I’m going to talk about is the additional equipment that the people in the isolation care area are going to be wearing. It’s going to look very similar to the hospital. They’re going to have gowns, gloves, goggles, face shields, all in 95 masks, which you hear about often in, in the media, all of these type, this type of equipment is available to our medically licensed volunteers who are going to be performing services in the isolation care.

So the next thing we’re going to talk about is I’m just going to walk you through very quickly a graphic.

If you go into an event and we have to establish a shelter, you’re going to see a picture that comes up that shows that everyone is going to go through the screening process.

And as you you click on this presentation graphic, it’s going to show how we’re diverting people from the mainstream shelter into isolation.

So we will shelter everyone.

Everyone is welcome.

And we make sure that we understand who needs additional care and who is able to go into the congregate shelter.

At that time, it’s now time to feed people.


Safe Feeding Guidance Provide Individually Packaged Meals Utilize local vendors to provide specialized meals to clients who require them based on dietary, cultural, or religious requirements Follow safe food handling guidelines Clean all surfaces with sanitizing spray, wipes or bleach solution every 2 hours during feeding times. Also before and after every meal Use the “set it down and step back” method when delivering face coverings, food or supplies after you ask which meal they need (standard, vegetarian, gluten free, etc.) Diagram showing 6 feet of distance between the food storage table, the food delivery table, and each client in the queue/line.

Safe Feeding Guidance Provide Individually Packaged Meals Utilize local vendors to provide specialized meals to clients who require them based on dietary, cultural, or religious requirements. Follow safe food handling guidelines. Clean all surfaces with sanitizing spray, wipes, or bleach solution every 2 hours during feeding times. Also, before and after every meal, use the “set it down and step back” method when delivering face coverings, food, or supplies after you ask which meal they need (standard, vegetarian, gluten-free, etc.) Diagram showing 6 feet of distance between the food storage table, the food delivery table, and each client in the queue/line.

And so the next slide is going to tell you a little bit about what we’ve done to modify our feeding guidelines.

First of all, you oftentimes would see us driving out in the community with kind of banquet style capability to put meals into an individual container and hand them out to the public.

We’re not doing that right now. We’re only feeding people who are in our shelters, or we’re making drops to a particular site.

But all of our meals now, rather than being banquet-style, are individually packaged as you can see this slide.

And we now have a set it down step back methodology that we’re using.

So if we’re in a hotel, for instance, and we’re feeding people, or if we’ve got them in a gymnasium, we’re going to have the food set up over on a table, there’ll be a six-foot distance between the net that table and the next table.

Then there will be a worker in between that will be wearing a mask and gloves.

And then there will be a setup, as you can see from the pictures at the bottom, where clients will be asked to line up much as you do in the grocery store six feet apart from each other, and you will then there’ll be a sign to tell you what’s available, you’ll be able to communicate that verbally.

All of our clients are wearing masks and gloves as well. And they will then identify what they want.

The worker will put it on the table and step back.

The family member will come up and take their food and take it back to their room or to wherever the eating area is.

We have found this to be very successful in maintaining social distancing and also ensuring that the least number of people are touching the food and what it’s in.


Maintain Social Distancing when Loading Supplies and Traveling Loading a truck with supplies.... If the vehicle has a single ‘cab’, only the driver will travel in the truck A chase car with the 2nd worker will be utilized Be sure to wipe down all surfaces you would normally touch before entering Both workers will wear a mask, gloves and maintain social distancing Use the ‘set it down, step back’ methodology for loading and unloading Be sure to wipe down all of the surfaces inside the vehicle when you finish your trip

Maintain Social Distancing when Loading Supplies and Traveling
Loading a truck with supplies…
If the vehicle has a single ‘cab,’ only the driver will travel in the truck.
A chase car with the 2nd worker will be utilized.
Be sure to wipe down all surfaces you would normally touch before entering.
Both workers will wear a mask, gloves, and maintain social distancing.
Use the ‘set it down, step back’ methodology for loading and unloading.
Be sure to wipe down all of the surfaces inside the vehicle when you finish your trip.

So, we are using that methodology for a couple of other things that I’ll just share with you as we get to the end of this discussion.

One is that we have we still have to provide supplies into the community.

And so you’ll oftentimes see our people in trucks.

What we’re doing is making sure that those large trucks that have a single cab, only the driver can be in with a mask, they wipe down all of the interiors, and there will be another volunteer in what we call a chase car behind them because we never send anyone out to the field. alone, they always go in pairs or even in caravan sometimes if there are multiples, but everyone will be wearing masks and gloves.

And we will use the set it down step back methodology to load and unload supplies, and even drop them, let’s say in a community for further distribution.

And last but not least, many of us have to get to where the disaster is. And we have quite a few people that would prefer not to get on an airplane to get there.

So whether you’re working locally in support of an activity or you’re commuting to a disaster, we now have some rules that say only two people can be in a car.

Everyone wears masks.

They will the driver will be in the front seat. The passenger will be in the backseat on the opposite side, the passenger side. This is the best way.

That we can maintain social distancing, and protect people well and keep them safe while they’re commuting in a vehicle.


Turn Compassion Into Action Volunteers carry out 90% of the humanitarian work of the American Red Cross. During this hurricane and wildfire season, it is more important than ever to get involved sooner rather than later. We are actively searching for volunteers willing to respond to emergencies, both in-person and virtually. It is through the efforts of ordinary people that we can do extraordinary things. Please consider joining our sheltering team today! Volunteers urgently needed for the following positions in your community: Mass Care Sheltering Responder (Helps provide a safe, welcoming place for people fleeing natural disasters), Mass Care Sheltering Supervior (Leads a team in creating a safe space for people to recover post-disaster), Disaster Health Services Supervisor (Leads a team to care or the health needs of sheltered clients. Special qualifications required.), Disaster Health Services Responder (Helps provide care and attention to the health needs of clients. Special qualifications required.) Interested? Send a note to CSTR@redcross.org with which opportunity you want to get started with!

Turn Compassion Into Action
Volunteers carry out 90% of the humanitarian work of the American Red Cross. During this hurricane and wildfire season, it is more important than ever to get involved sooner rather than later. We are actively searching for volunteers willing to respond to emergencies, both in-person and virtually. It is through the efforts of ordinary people that we can do extraordinary things. Please consider joining our sheltering team today!
Volunteers urgently needed for the following positions in your community: Mass Care Sheltering Responder (Helps provide a safe, welcoming place for people fleeing natural disasters), Mass Care Sheltering Supervisor (Leads a team in creating a safe space for people to recover post-disaster), Disaster Health Services Supervisor (Leads a team to care or the health needs of sheltered clients. Special qualifications required.), Disaster Health Services Responder (Helps provide care and attention to the health needs of clients. Special qualifications required.)
Interested? Send a note to CSTR@redcross.org about which opportunity you want to get started with!

So that’s just a little bit of an insight into what we’re doing to keep our clients and our volunteers and our workers safe. At the same time, we continue to serve the community in times of disaster.

My last slide really shows you the fact that it’s just to let you know that we always have room for more volunteers, and now more than ever, this is an increased hurricane season we’re already on.

I think Tropical Storm Josefin, which is number 10 in the alphabet, and they’re predicting that we will probably see between 20 and 24 named storms before the end of November.

And I will tell you the average age of a volunteer in the Red Cross is in the low 60s.

So we do have people who would prefer not to go out into the field.

Now, the good news is we have changed our methodology so that almost all of our disaster workers 70% of anyone that would work on a disaster are going to work from home using video technology.

But there’s still a group of people about 30% of our response that have to be in the field to take care of our clients, to feed them to shelter them, and to take care of them.

Those are the folks that we’re asking people to consider joining us during these next few months.

So you will get a copy of this particular presentation, and it is an email and a little description of the types of people we’re looking for.

And there are also some YouTube videos to give us some insight into what we do.

And with that, I’m going to end my part of the present.

And I hope you found it informative.

And I hope that you’ll continue to see the Red Cross as a valuable part of your community.

"Thank you (Red Cross emblem)" on a Post-It Note

“Thank you (Red Cross emblem)” on a Post-It Note.

Thank you. Share that.


Now, that’s great

And hearing how your organization is is approaching solving problems of working in a COVID environment is really interesting.

I think our museum community is struggling with creating those sorts of solutions to problems that we didn’t think we had.

But recognize now that the way we used to do things can’t be the way we do things for the foreseeable future.

And I think we’ll get back to that a little bit later.


Resources – Training for New Shelter Workers For partners who do not have any shelter training or experience, we recommend 3 Red Cross classes available on YouTube: 1. Shelter Fundamentals v2 and Shelter Fundamentals Forms Training – 57 min.; https://youtu.be/jwgBgG4s6Mo; 2. Sheltering in a COVID-19 Environment – 21 min.; https://youtube.com/watch?v=pKpvlBbbYQc; 3. COVID-19 Shelter Assignments – 14 min. https://youtube.com/watch?v=Iz3mLhj5HP4

Resources – Training for New Shelter Workers For partners who do not have any shelter training or experience, we recommend 3 Red Cross classes available on YouTube: 1. Shelter Fundamentals v2 and Shelter Fundamentals Form Training – 57 min.; https://youtu.be/jwgBgG4s6Mo; 2. Sheltering in a COVID-19 Environment – 21 min.; https://youtube.com/watch?v=pKpvlBbbYQc; 3. COVID-19 Shelter Assignments – 14 min.
https://youtube.com/watch?v=Iz3mLhj5HP4

And I did like your pitch about asking if there are people that are on the call.

They could perhaps be interested in working with the Red Cross.

That’s very valuable.

I think that there’s a good synergy there.

And that gives us an experience as a group of museum specialists that will prove really valuable in the future, you know, even when we’re not volunteering with you all.

But thank you very much.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Questions & Answers

I think I think this point now we’re about ready to move on to the question, and answer section and, and some people have been adding questions to the chat line, and those have been being fed.

To me, I don’t think in any particular order. We could feel some of those questions.

Dan, when does the hurricane season started in was was was? The first question and this happened. I’m going to let you nominally the season starts June 1, but the last several years, we’ve had may storms.

So you might say mid-May, and then the season ends at the end of November.

Now for us in Texas, the season effectively ends probably more like early October because those late-season storms tend to curve away.

Websites available to everyone; National Mass Care Strategy Website: https://nationalmasscarestrategy.org/; American Red Cross (Covid19 guidance – available to the public; Copy and paste the website details into your browser

Websites available to everyone; National Mass Care Strategy Website:
https://nationalmasscarestrategy.org/; American Red Cross (Covid19 guidance – available to the public; Copy and paste the website details into your browser

So I know we have people from all over, but nominally June 1 to November 30.

And then Superstorm Sandy occurred quite late. It did it occurred around Halloween upon the New England coast.

And sure that the East Coast and the Florida Peninsula, you know, they can get storms really anytime during that hurricane season period.

Okay, great. Great.

Let’s see. Jason. Do you have any resources or Organizations that exist to help institutions do a very thorough on-site walk risk assessment of their buildings or their institution?

Oh, good question. Um, I don’t know if there’s any in our region, Steve, you might know better than me. I know the Northeast document center, I will post their link. They’ll do that. And I know there’s also a large group in Philadelphia that do that and they’ll travel all over the other name escapes me, but I’ll find you here in a second put it in the chat room as well. I, you know, when you look at Steve, let be no time in. No, I think it’s a gap.

COVID-19 Sheltering Guidance is Publicly Available to Partners

COVID-19 Sheltering Guidance is Publicly Available to Partners

It would be nice to be able to have reliable assessors. And, you know, there it could come from several, several different sources that might be something that AIC would be able to provide As an assessment sort of tool, but otherwise, I did it several times encouraged insurance companies to look into funding that kind of thing because we’d save them a lot of money. But no one’s taking me up on that yet.

Sounds good. And the melody, how much training does a person need to volunteer with the Red Cross?

Well, that’s a really good question. And for a shelter worker, just someone who is in either a hotel or a gymnasium helping taking care of people. We right now, it takes about from start to finish about three hours.

There are five different courses that are available. A couple of them are videos, and the rest are available online through our training system.

 Websites available to everyone**

Websites available to everyone**

So about five hours and a background check, because we don’t want to.

We always make sure that everyone who volunteers with us passes a standard background check to ensure the safety of everyone involved.

And then, if you want to be a supervisor because you have that sort of in your background, there are some additional courses available. And right now, all of our courses are delivered online, so you don’t have to go to a class in order to do them.

Great. Great. Thank you. I got a couple of general questions. Let me throw this one out here, and anybody can feel it may actually be a little bit different from different perspectives.


After disaster. How quickly can I get to my museum?

Does anyone want us to start on that?

The only thing I’ll say is I know after Hurricane Ike, the jurisdictions were putting out a lot of good information.

On when is it safe to return? So that’s more of a general answer than the museum itself. But a lot of times the jurisdiction will have some guidance on that, like, Hey, you know what, it’s not safe to come back yet. And you would call your emergency manager of that jurisdiction, for example.

There are websites available usually operated by the Department of Transportation in states that will tell you which roads are passable. And so you should always check to make sure that it’s safe to go into an area and I wouldn’t recommend traveling alone if you can avoid it. Perfectly. We do still seem to be getting some feedback. Not sure, but we’ll try to try to work through it.

I can reiterate that.

Each disaster is different, and it does pay dividends.

Everyone just checks their mute to see if they’re muted because we’re getting some interference.

But it does pay dividends to be proactive in contact your local office of emergency management, whether that’s at the city or county level. And, or perhaps if you’re in a small enough town, just be your emergency manager might be your Chief Fire Chief.

But make connections with them so you can understand what their point of view is, and that there are certain restrictions they have to operate under that that have to do with putting people safety first, and that there are limits to how quickly people can go back into some areas.

And so there may be some restrictions, but there may be some means to be able to work with them. The other component of all that is that there are some areas that there might be a mandatory evacuation order so that you’re told to leave, and hopefully, you do for your own safety.

But then it might even be more difficult to get back into taking a look at your collections.

I remember that that happened in Beaumont to the director of the McFadden Ward house several hurricanes ago, and he had a difficult time getting back in, and he had to rely on a neighbor’s to walk by their facilities to give them a report on Windows and trees and, and things like that, that they would be interested in, in knowing about sooner than later.

So let me go to another question for Dan.


Will the Atlantic and Caribbean be more active this year or the Pacific Coast?

Certainly, the Atlantic will be active as it has been we very well may run out of names. And before we sign off, I can show you what’s going on out there now, maybe at the end. But the Pacific coast, of course, we have a hurricane. Right. They’re making a close approach right now. So but I would say for certainly Atlantic and the Caribbean are looking at a very active season, maybe not quite as active for the eastern Pacific.

Okay, thank you. Thank you.

You know, we used to have an app that was hosted by Heritage Preservation, that Jason was I am I correct in thinking that that that really, really useful helpful app for your phone is being now picked up by NCPTT or is that a different initiative?

So it was originally written by NCPTT based on the Disaster Recovery Wheel. And it is I’ve been told it’s being handed over to FAIC soon that should be back on the market. If you have an old one, it still works, but it can’t be upgraded. And I believe that is actually going to be picked up by FAIC possibly in the very near future.

Okay, because that was a great tool great to have in your pocket with your phone.

Yes.


Melody.

Red Cross is part of vo add the volunteer organizations active in disaster correct. I wonder if you could say something about how those functions, and I wonder If there are multiple avenues of connecting info ads that can be helpful for museums.

Yes, we are a member of the vo ad community, and there are tips there’s. Again, because I live in Texas, I’ll use it as an example, there is a statewide vo ad. And actually, a gentleman who has volunteered with the Red Cross is the leader of that right now. But there’s also vo ads within each community potentially. It’s really a combination of faith-based organizations and other organizations that have volunteers or are interested in joining forces towards helping people in some way. It’s not always a disaster. It’s other kinds of things that they do a lot of training. There’s a lot of Recovery Services, counseling services, things of that nature. And you can probably contact, you can just do a Volvo ad search within Google. But you can also contact any of your local Red Cross chapter offices. And they may very well be able to link you with members of the vo ag community in that in that local area. I’d also like to tell you that there is the Red Cross has a preparedness and alert system that’s free for your phones that you can download, and if it can’t, it’s a combination of telling you how to get ready for specific types of events whether that be a storm or a wildfire or an earthquake or whatever it might be a flood talks about how to avoid home fires because unfortunately, those happen lat. And lastly, there is a way for you to set it up for alerts for specific geographies. So if you live in one place and your children are going to college someplace else, or they live in another part of the country, you can actually monitor multiple locations that you can set, and that way it will tell you what’s going on, not only where you live, but in other areas where you’re interested in the safety of your family and friends.

I think that individual organizations or small organizations, like even perhaps a museum can become a member. It might be a little difficult, but there are indigents. Can you tell us something more about the advantages, discounts and and and and access to resources that Being a member of a vo ad might bring to you? And I believe that I’ve just gotten a chat message that we go through, perhaps go through the state to make a request like that.

And it looks like you have your looks like the AIC National Heritage responders isn’t is a member of Oh, and I’m not familiar with the discounts that you get, but I know that what’s really incredible is the amount of time that all of us as just community members have the opportunity to give you know if we choose to give it and it’s just a matter of what you what really you’re passionate about, but I find a lot of the partners we work within the Red Cross are we work with Catholic charities we work with the Baptist family, children Family Services, we work with the Baptist men in the Southern Baptist men in particular, and they specialize in certain activities and supportive disasters, whether that be preparing food, the or they may do the cleanup, something they call muck out where they’ll go into your home and get all the mud and everything else out of your house. They have sifters that they provide and people to come out and help you go through the remains of a home fire to find, you know, whatever’s left. That’s a value to you. So there’s there are so many opportunities and so many incredible organizations that bring together people to help others and you know, just like what you’re doing. I’ve learned so much in the last two weeks of working with Steve and Dan Marian and Jason and others about what you folks do, and I’m incredibly impressed and quite happy to hear that you are working towards, you know, conserving these important items.

1:27:16
Absolutely. Thank you. Dan, can you explain what the spaghetti models are and how people can make the best use of the variety of projections they see in the news media because it’s, it’s helpful but confusing at the same time.

1:27:33
Sure, and we actually encourage people to look more at the forecast cone from the National Hurricane Center then all those individual lines. I can tell you even this week, this The so-called spaghetti charts have been changing every six hours. So when I came on this morning at 7am, the thinking was, oh, that this system in the Caribbean could go anywhere, you know, anywhere from Florida to Mexico. There’s a Line, right. And now they’re starting to consolidate Texas moreover. So they are useful in the sense that the more spread there is, the more uncertainty there is. So you can gather some information there. But in the reality of those 15 lines, you see, there might be five or so that are really credible. Let’s put it that way. So there is information, you can learn about what each of the lines represents. They’re each different tracking model. And I can certainly pass that on. But just in general, it gives you an idea of the confidence in the track if they’re a very tight cluster that does give you some information that there is more confidence. And if they’re way spread out, then it does tell you that the track is very, is not very uncertain. So I would answer it that way.

And then for Jason on our earlier question about getting a start, Institutions getting assistance doing assessments does a capped grant. Cover that kind of thing does has been added over the years?

That’s the question that I actually don’t know the answer to. That would make sense that it would. But I’ve never seen anyone applied for that. To have that done, so it may, and I’ve just never seen anyone apply for it, or any awarded that before that. But a good thing to ask some of the agencies like I posted information about the conservation center it’s CCA h a.org. That would be a good thing to ask them because I know that this is one of the things they deal a lot with, and I know they deal with a lot of cat grants and a lot of grants. So that’s something I would ask them, and of course, the granting agency will All right. Well, let’s

I had another question for you since your since you’re on there before you mute is that if a collection area becomes damp or wet, what steps should be taken to prevent further damage from bold? Like, let’s just imagine that you’ve also lost power. And it’s either, you know, already submerged and drying and you’re trying to dry it out, or it’s under threat because it’s still 100% humidity, you know, in in the structure, is there anything that can be that you can recommend it was or approach or some resource that people could go to?

Sure. So if you’re, if it’s right after the disaster and you’re trying to do it yourself, of course, if you have power, you know, dehumidifiers fans and air circulation, try to get as much as the water out some pumps, paper towel, you know, whatever you can do to get the water out sponges, bucket, Brigade, whatever. If you don’t have power, Gotta get rid of that water. If you can’t get rid of the water, you have to get the item out. If you have hook paper items, the best thing is to try to get them somewhere and frozen, and you can deal with later. Do you have more complex items or getting them out, getting them somewhere that air around them? I know for photographs, we might stretch a clothesline outside and basically pin them up just like you would in the old photography process when you’re drawing them after developing for textile, the same thing we’ll get them out even outside stretchers out of Windows screen or galvanized fencing, anything we can get that will allow air to flow around them. That’ll help start to dry them out. Because Yeah, if we for those of you that are in the south and in the Gulf We might have, you might have the storm is over no power, but yeah, you’ve got 100% humidity outside. So just trying to drive best you can with books and papers and things like that, you know, inserting paper towels between the pages and blotting them that way same with books and furniture just trying to get as much excess water off as you can and really helping promote air circulation around them. That’ll make just start to dry them that way is the best thing.

Right and there are some old Heritage Preservation videos that cover some of that, and then you at you, your staff at NCPTT, are trying to generate some other videos that can provide guidance, correct?

Yes, we started, so we did a couple of webinars. Those were recorded. And I’ll see if I can find them. I post the links, and we were supposed to do more, but unfortunately, COVID has sort of stopped video production right now. But working with magic, there will be a series of videos on different things photography, textiles, more complex textiles, like furniture. We already didn’t want to deter me. Because as we all know, here in the south, most collections have some taxidermy and most hunters. So we’re we’ll be doing more videos like that. They do to COVID, but they’re coming out Yes.

Okay, and I hope that people will go in and keep track of some of the chat room to everyone that their comments that are coming in that may be a little bit too hard to keep keep track of, but I’ve noticed a couple of good responses that flashed right before me as I was trying to pay attention to something else, but one came from our Head of engineering and facilities at far he said that he’s relied heavily on our insurance company to help with assessments of vulnerabilities for our structures and therefore our collections, so that might be another avenue of people finding support for identification of gaps in their preparation.

Now, Mary is is

I’m not seeing a whole lot of other questions being posted that I see on my little quick checklist, is their bro. Is there anything that’s showing up with anybody else that we need to probably be really great to be able to do Asked while we have everyone here. If not, we could go to the last slide, which is something that is a sort of a listing of credit crediting some of the groups that have supported this webinar, and then we post that.

Steve, can I make a comment before we move on there? Sure.

The cut the incident pair, the question came up on people being able to get in on first response into a building after a disaster no matter what it is, and we have run across the problem because everybody assumes you can just go out and get a first responder card or put something on it because here in Houston is you’re aware, they put roadblocks up, and if you don’t have the first responder, identification or placard on the vehicle, it shows that they’re not going to let you throw so we ran into a problem getting our First Responders normally stay in place, but the ones that come in to help out, we found that there was an organization that makes out a first responder card unless you are actually a fireman, policeman or in the medical field. So what we had done and they found that acceptable is we made up a form that shows that this individual is on the first responder chain that is filled out with where what building they’re going, what their job actually is. And every individual gets to copy that here at the MFH. And also, a copy goes in HR with the telephone number on both sheets. So if a police officer or somebody was to stop anybody, they would simply call the number, and that would go over to our HR department. So yes, that person is indeed a first responder.

Excellent, excellent. Thanks. That’s certainly left. A lot more organized and more reliable than What I used to get into Galveston after Ike. But that was useful then but maybe not so much anymore, which. At that point, anybody that showed up with a hardhat and a vest was lit it. But I think that that that’s not reliable. And I like the approach that you’re taking.

Yes, this is Mary Striegel.

Want to thank everybody, please make sure they’re muted. One of the things that I have seen is that, as conservators, we feel an urgency to get to those most sensitive materials first, but we have to remember that health and human safety is the number one issue in the early days after a disaster. And what we can only hope is that we will be able to get to our collections soon, but we may not be able to get to them in the first day or two.

Always the challenge, and it’s nerve-racking.

Any other comments or questions? Before we wrap, I was wondering if I could show you currently for me, Okay.

I’m gonna try to share my

Can you see my screen now?

Yes, it was the Hurricane Center website. Can anybody see that?

Yes, we can see it. Okay, so this is hurricanes.gov. You can see Tropical Depression 14 and 13, which you can do is click on the storm of interest. So I’m going to click on 14 First, and from the National Hurricane Center against his hurricanes.gov. You can see where the storm is forecast to go. And also the timing of it. And you could just kind of scroll around these different thumbnails. So I would encourage you to kind of experiment with this. And for those of us in Texas, you know, this is a media concern. You can see right now the storm is forecast to track somewhere within this cone, approaching the Texas coast or maybe Louisiana, along with about Tuesday of next week. And then we can go back and pick 13. I know we have people from all over on the call. And similarly, we can look at the forecast there as well. So some of the Caribbean islands are in play and also certainly Florida. So two storms to look at again, I’d encourage you to look@hurricanes.gov the other thing weather.gov. You can start there and click on Your area on this map. So if I click on Southeast Texas, that will take you to our weather office. And so I would highly recommend those two sites hurricanes.gov and then weather.gov, for monitoring of the incoming tropical systems during the hurricane season.

So I’m going to go ahead and stop sharing now. But I just wanted to show that very quickly.

Mary?

Yes, I want to thank everyone for coming. We have one slide that shows our contributors, and those who are have contributed to us have helped by getting the word out about this event. They are people and organizations that have the ability to help you with more information. And so, James, if you could put that final slide up.

To thank our contributors’ heritage emergency national Task Force, he MTF co-sponsored by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, FEMA, and the Smithsonian Institution, is a partnership of 16 national service organizations and federal agencies.

at&t F’s mission is to protect cultural heritage and our nation-states, tribes, territories, and local communities from the damaging effects of natural disasters and other emergencies.

National Heritage responders and HR are a group of conservators, archivists, collection managers, and other professionals from across the country. Together, they have a diverse skill set and experience in handling a wide range of materials, from paper to textiles to paintings and more. And HR has deployed experts to assist with major floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, and more insights countrywide.

The group provides assistance by phone and email to collecting institutions affected by everything from leaking pipes to roof damage.

The National Heritage responders are available 24 seven for remote assistance at 202-661-8068.


Alliance for responses South Florida. AFR South Florida is dedicated to building a partnership between the art and cultural community, the first responders, and the emergency management community in Broward, Miami Dade, and Monroe counties.

The goals of the Alliance are to facilitate a partnership between the alliance members, first responders, and emergency managers in South Florida to provide preparedness and outreach opportunities for both the art and cultural community, the first responders, and the emergency management community and to develop a robust incident command structure for the alliance to respond to large scale emergencies and disasters.


APOYOnline Association for Heritage Preservation of the Americas.

APOYOnline is a nonprofit organization that has been promoting communication, exchange, and professional development in the field of heritage preservation in the Americas and the Portuguese and Spanish speaking countries for over 30 years.

In particular, we offer workshops and technical translations and topics such as emergency preparedness and response, risk management, communication, leadership, preservation on a budget, international alliances COVID-19 matters, among others.

They are available on their own website, social media, and YouTube channel. For more information, contact info at APOYOnline.com


Florida Association of Museums offers educational programs and services on a wide array of topics relevant to the staff of Florida museums.

Part of that program includes referee resources on its website for developing an emergency response plan, as well as free webinars related to emergency planning and response.

Visit our website for more information on upcoming webinars, recorded programming, and other resources.


Houston Arts Alliance is local art and cultural organization whose principal work is to implement the city of Houston’s vision, values, and goals for its arts grantmaking and civic art investments as work is conducted through contracts with the city of Houston overseen by the Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs.

He also executes privately funded special projects to meet the needs of the arts community, such as disaster preparations, research of the state of the arts in Houston, and temporary public art programs that energize neighborhoods. In short, ha helps artists and nonprofits. Be bold, productive, and strong.


National Park Service National Center for Preservation Technology and Training is a research center of the National Park Service located on the campus of Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, Louisiana. NCPTT helps preservation find better tools, better materials, and better approaches to conserving buildings, landscapes, sites, and collections.

Since 2005, NCPTT has aggregated Emergency Preparedness and Response information for collectors, museum professionals, cultural resource managers, building and maintenance crews, and others who care for cultural heritage resources have been assembled to help people mitigate risks to cultural resources when faced with a disaster.

Whether you need to prepare for a disaster, mitigate damage after a disaster, or seek the assistance of a conservator.

These resources can help your institution with preparation and recovery efforts.


New Orleans Preservation Coalition

The New Orleans Preservation Coalition serves as an alliance of concerned organizations, agencies, and individuals who recognize the need to sustain and protect the area’s cultural heritage.

The Coalition’s mission is to provide opportunities for preservation education, disaster response, and related activities within the New Orleans area.


Performing Arts Readiness Org

Performing Arts organizations can be especially vulnerable to emergencies and disasters of all times, resulting in destabilization and catastrophic loss of income and assets.

The Performing Arts Readiness PR Project helps to perform arts organizations nationwide learn how to protect their assets, sustain the operation, and be prepared for emergencies.

PR supports arts organizations as important cultural centers, places of business, and cultural anchors through educational programs, preparedness planning tools and grants, and information and referrals when disaster strikes. For more information, please go to www.PerformingArtsReadiness.Org.


Texas Historical Commission Museum Services offer free support and guidance via phone and email on all aspects of museum operations, ranging from collections care to exhibit development, strategic planning, and emergency preparedness, and more.

In the aftermath of a disaster, people often do not know where to start. They can call museum services, and we can talk them through where to start in the recovery process and point them to available resources.


Texas Collections Emergency Resource Alliance is an affiliation of institutions and professionals to advocate for and support the preservation of Texas cultural heritage.

Texas CERA emphasize emergency planning first, Followed by training in response and recovery techniques. They help mitigate the loss of collections due to disaster by offering professional development workshops, consultations, and statewide institutional networking.


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National Center for Preservation Technology and Training
645 University Parkway
Natchitoches, LA 71457

Email: ncptt[at]nps.gov
Phone: (318) 356-7444
Fax: (318) 356-9119